Heterodox Economics Newsletter

Issue 323 February 19, 2024 web pdf Heterodox Economics Directory

During the last weeks, I have received the sad news that the full editorial board of the Journal of Economic Surveys has stepped down from their positions. This is sad, because the Journal of Economic Surveys not only provided a great service to the profession by publishing highly interesting review papers and meta-analyses, but was also an established journal open for submissions with a heterodox background.

However, the development leading to this decision is actually even more saddening. As I have been told, current editors have been alienated by the publisher, due to the latter's demands to massively increase the volume of published papers. To publish as many papers as possible is thereby a long-standing trend (for at least two decades or so) in the predatory publishing business, where authors are charged high fees to get their papers accepted. It is quite evident that such a business model profits from greater turnaround and, at the same time, shocking to see that an established publisher like Wiley moves in such a direction.

As the request to increase turnaround in many instances implies a request to reduce the quality of published papers, such demands are an immanent threat to the integrity of related journals, which provides a compelling case for how the race for ever higher profits can undermine the intrinsic quality of the underlying products. Moreover, and also more alarmingly, such concerns cannot even be resolved by established editors resigning as the property rights on the journal itself – and its track record of publications – in many cases belongs to the publisher, which typically reserves the right to appoint new editors for the respective outlets. As so often property rights and associated issues of power and control are crucial, eventually.

It is also important to note that requests like the one received by the Journal of Economic Surveys are no isolated instances, but are applied quite systematically. Even highly reputed journals within Wiley's portfolio – like the Journal of Political Philosophy or Philosophy & Public Affairs have witnessed a similar demand, which in the case of the former also led to a large number of resigning editors and editorial board members (see here and here). Along these lines, we have to suspect that also other journals relevant to heterodox research within Wiley's portfolio – like Metroeconomica or the Review of Income and Wealth– are potentially under threat.

While I see no quick fix for these concerning developments, the move of the original editors of the Journal of Political Philosophy to create a reincarnation in a non-profit environment (see here for some details) seems legitimate to me. Indeed, I would tend to agree with those empirical assessments that identify non-profit publishers to deliver more 'value-for-money' than commercial publishers (e.g. here). Most, probably the ideal organizational form for scientific publishing would be large coops that marry economics of scale in production and distribution with sensibility for the intrinsic requirements of scientific discourse. Such a combination would also allow for better justifying the huge amount of implicit subsidies the publishing industry receives (see here).

All the best,

Jakob

PS: Ironically, even the supposedly pro-market AEA follows a related model...

© public domain

Table of contents

Call for Papers

15th Annual PKES PhD Conference (London, May 2024)

09:30-18:00 BST 24 May | University of Greenwich, London

The Post-Keynesian Economics Society (PKES), in collaboration with the Young Scholar Initiative (YSI) Keynesian Economics Working Group and the Centre of Political Economy, Governance, Finance and Accountability (PEGFA) at the University of Greenwich, is organizing its 15th annual PhD student conference on the 24th of May 2024, 09:30-18:00 BST. The conference will be held in person at the University of Greenwich, London. It gives students the opportunity to present a chapter of their PhD dissertation and receive detailed and structured feedback from a senior researcher from PKES in a friendly environment.

We invite applications from students who are in a later stage of their PhD and who work on topics relevant to Post-Keynesian and heterodox economics more broadly. Amongst others, this includes topics such as inequality and stagnation, the ecological crisis, structural dependencies in the Global South, the care economy and financialisation. Submissions should qualify as a novel contribution to the literature and be at the stage of pre-publication. We usually do not consider dissertation proposals, literature reviews, or papers based on master’s dissertations.

We actively encourage submissions from people who are underrepresented in economics research. This includes – but is not limited to – individuals who identify as women, black or ethnic minorities, those with disabilities, or members of the LGBTQ+ community. Should we receive more eligible applications than we can accommodate, these students will be given priority.

Please submit your working paper and a cover letter of up to 300 words describing your research interest and how your dissertation topic relates to heterodox economics via this form. We accept applications on a rolling basis and aim to inform applicants whether they are accepted as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that the final deadline for submissions to present at the conference is the 28th of March. We will inform you about acceptance at the latest by the 8th of April 2024 and assign reviewers to you.

Students can also submit their work to be considered for the Mark Hayes Prize. The prize will be awarded to an outstanding paper presented at the PhD conference that furthers the advancement of Post-Keynesian and heterodox economics. The prize is named after Mark Hayes (1956-2019), an exemplary Keynes scholar and former Secretary of PKES. The prize winner will receive £200 and will be announced at the end of the conference. If you would like your submission to be considered for the Mark Hayes prize, you must submit your paper via the form in advance of the general deadline by the 5th of March. The prize selection committee consists of PKES committee members.

There is no participation fee for the conference. Lunch and refreshments will be provided thanks to generous funding by PEGFA. The conference will include a social dinner, sponsored by YSI, to give the opportunity to young scholars to come together in person, build their network and get involved with the heterodox economics community and YSI.

In addition, YSI will offer partial stipends for accommodation and national as well as international travel for selected young scholars who will present at the conference. Scholarships are limited, and aimed at students who cannot obtain (sufficient) funding from their university or other academic funding sources. Travel via plane should be avoided if possible. We are also not able to reimburse taxis or rented cars. Please indicate in your cover letter should you wish to be considered for this, and explain that you have exhausted funding from your university. To justify a travel stipend for participants coming from overseas for a 1-day event to our funders, it would help us if you could include an explanation of how the travel stipend can help you with attending academic activities other than the PhD conference in the UK/ Europe. This could be conferences or meetings with academic collaborators. Provided applicants are eligible, scholarships will be allocated on a first-come first-served basis, so early application is encouraged.

Please don’t hesitate to contact the organisers via pkes.phd.conference@gmail.com should you have any questions.

The link to the application form can be found here. Updates can be found on the event website. Please also see information on the YSI website here.

Submission Deadline: 28 March 2024

Mark Hayes Prize Deadline: 5 March 2024

17th Forum of the World Association for Political Economy (Athens, August 2024)

2-4 August 2024 | Panteion University, Athens, Greece

Conference Theme: "Political Economy vs Economics in a turbulent multipolar world"

The 17th WAPE Forum will be held 2-4 August 2024 at Panteion University, Athens, Greece. It is co-organised by WAPE (World Association of Political Economy) and GAPE (Greek Association of Political Economy) and hosted by the Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences.

The broad theme of the conference focuses on the long-standing controversy between the two main alternative traditions in economic analysis: Political Economy and Economics. Economics (with their individualistic, non-social view of the economy) have historically failed to grasp how economies work and forecast and why, how and when economic crises occur. On the other hand, Political Economy and especially its Marxist variant (proposing a social and historical understanding of the economy, linking economic analysis to social and political factors and to class struggle) has been far more successful in comprehending the actual workings of the economy and in analyzing economic crises. Economics’ shortcomings have become even more pronounced as the 21st century ushered a period of global political and economic turbulence (economic crises erupt with an increasing frequency, geopolitical conflicts multiply and take increasingly violent forms) which they continue to fail to understand. Nevertheless, their dominance of academia and policy-making centers, especially in the West, continues uninterrupted because of their classless approach and their unbashful support for the capitalist system. The small cosmetic changes from Neoliberalism to neoconservative New Keynesianism do not amount to a serious change of perspective and continue to misapprehend the real modus operandi of contemporary societies and their economies. Nevertheless, there is growing unrest within both the academia and the society with this failed dominance. Political Economy is the main approach towards which all those dissatisfied with Economics turn.

This conference aims to juxtapose Political Economy and Economics and contrast their positions on the various fields and areas of economic analysis. In particular, it aims to attract towards Political Economy the dissatisfaction with Economics of a growing mass of scientists and students. In this vein and within its broad theme, WAPE 2024 invites all contributions that enrich the perspective of Political Economy.

Indicatively but not exclusively, proposed papers can touch upon the following issues:

  1. Contemporary controversies in Macroeconomics between Neoclassicism, Keynesianism and Marxism:
    1. Neoliberalism, New Keynesianism and the New Macroeconomic Consensus
    2. Marxism and macro-economic modelling
  2. Curriculum reform in Economics: How Political Economy can challenge Economics’ dominance of university curricula.
  3. History of Political Economy
  4. Economic History
  5. Theory of stages and periodization of capitalism
  6. Theories and analyses of economic crisis
  7. Profitability, crises and economic cycles
  8. Race, class and gender
  9. Methodology of economic analysis
  10. Trends and challenges in contemporary economic policy:
    1. Neoconservative economic policies
    2. Economic planning, fiscal and monetary policies reconsidered
    3. A return of industrial policy?
    4. Noönomy and contemporary Russian contribution to the economic policy debate
    5. Modernization theory and the Chinese contribution
  11. Marxism and the Political Economy of money and finance:
    1. Contemporary capitalism and transformations of the financial system
    2. Fictitious capital and the contemporary changes in the production-circulation nexus
    3. Central banking in contemporary capitalism
    4. US hegemony and de-dollarisation
    5. The political economy of crypto-currencie
  12. Labour process, markets and the Political Economy of Work
    1. Labour movement and Trade Unions
    2. Exploitation, flexibility of labor and unemployment
    3. The current state of Labour Process Theory
    4. Automation, AI and their impact on unemployment, income distribution and the economic cycles
    5. Platforms, casualization of labour and the contemporary workplace
  13. The Political Economy of Social Policy
    1. Austerity and the welfare system
    2. Poverty and inequality
    3. The pensions system and its neoconservative reforms
  14. The Political Economy of education:
    1. Commodification of education
    2. Class barriers and education
    3. Student debt
    4. The entrepreneurial university
  15. The Political Economy of Health Policies:
    1. Inequalities and class barriers in health provision
    2. The new emerging epidemics and the experience of the COVID-19
    3. Public vs private healthcare sectors
  16. Environmental Political Economy:
    1. Climate change and class struggle
    2. Capitalism’s metabolic rift
    3. Imperialist and geopolitical conflicts and the climate
  17. Urban and regional Political Economy:
    1. The city-countryside contradiction in contemporary capitalism
    2. Labour geographies
  18. Law and Political Economy
  19. Geopolitical Economy: globalization or imperialism? Development or war?'
    1. International conflicts and imperialism
    2. The retreat of US hegemony and the emergence of a multi-polar world system
    3. The Political Economy of capital flows
    4. BRICS, the newly emerging economies and the world economy
    5. Global value chains and transnational corporations
    6. Political Economy of foreign direct investment (FDI)
    7. International Political Economy
  20. Political Economy of European integration:
    1. Is the Eurozone crisis over?
    2. European Union: from aspiring to become the new economic superpower falling behind?
    3. Divisions and conflicts within the European integration – euro-centre versus euro-periphery in the 21st century
  21. Development studies at an impasse
    1. The developmental state after the Post-Washington Consensus
    2. Role and policies of international organizations (IMF, WB, WHO, UNHCR, UN etc.)
    3. Development and underdevelopment in the 21st century
  22. Country case studies

On these, but also on other subjects, WAPE encourages the formation of work groups that continue to co-operate beyond the period of the conference. WAPE will support these workgroups by hosting them on its webpages and promoting their work. WAPE also encourages the proposal of a series of panels on subjects within the broad scope of the conference. Colleagues or groups that are interested in organizing such panels should contact the Organisation Committee directly (via WAPE2023@panteion.gr ). Additionally, the 17th WAPE Forum will include a Young Scholars’ Section. Ongoing PhD students can apply to present mature parts of their work within this section. The rate for students (50 euros) applies in the case of the Young Scholars’ Section.

How to apply

Send a paper abstract (500 words) and your full curriculum vitae in English to WAPE2024@panteion.gr by 20 April 2024. Acceptance letters and instructions for registration will be sent out by 20 May 2024. The structure and the schedule of registration fees are detailed below. Full papers must be submitted by 1 July 2024.
You are also welcome to propose other topics on the theme. There is also the option to apply to attend the forum without presenting a paper. In that case, you will be sent an invitation letter for visa purposes etc. upon registration and payment of registration fees.

Deadline for abstract proposals: 20 April 2024

2024 HETSA Conference (Sydney, September 2024)

26-27 September 2024 | Sydney, Australia

The 2024 HETSA Conference will be held at Alphacrucis University College, Cowper St Parramatta, Sydney, Australia from 26-27 September. Registration will be $200, or $50 for students. The conference dinner will be at a local restaurant on the evening of 26 September. Cost additional to registration.There will be a pre-conference reception at 4pm on 25 September.

Submission Process

If you would like to present a paper, please email an abstract including references to the organiser Professor Paul Oslington at paul.oslington@ac.edu.au. A full paper can also be provided, and this is preferred for students and junior scholars without a record of publication in the field. All papers should be in English. Contributions are especially welcome from students, and we are very open to contributions from scholars whose primary discipline is not the history of economics (such as history of science, history of philosophy, political economy) whose work is relevant to issues in our field.

Early submission will help us greatly and decisions will be made on a rolling basis up to finalization of the program one month before the conference.

Please note: the HETSA website is currently not functioning, and should be migrating to the Taylor and Francis History of Economics Review website. Hopefully, we will have a registration link there soon. The Preliminary Programm of the Conference is available here.

2025 AFEE@ASSA and ICAPE (San Francisco, January 2025)

3-6 January 2024 | San Francisco, CA, USA

Please find attached the Call for Papers for the upcoming 2025 AFEE meetings in San Francisco, CA, January 3-6. Please consider submitting a proposal for a paper or a panel, and also please forward to kindred spirits liberally.

Conference Theme: "Markets, Industries and Firms in Transition to Sustainability: How can institutional economics contribute?"

The world faces substantial sustainability challenges. Climate change and environmental degradation including substantial biodiversity reduction, are impacting individuals, communities, countries and the world as whole. How to address these challenges, as the world population grows, in a way that is justified and does not entrench or further increase current inequalities? Economies, industries and business need to transition to address the challenges. The agrifood industry is perhaps prime among sectors that now aggravates the challenges (e.g., Crippa et al 2021), undergoes the negative consequences already (e.g., Mahaut et al. 2022), yet is quintessential in solving them (Zurek et al. 2022), and is positioning to try to do so (Wolfert et al 2023). Any transition without a proper role for markets will be devastating in terms of famines and overall hardship (Sen 1981; Ó Grada 2020). Other industries, contributors to the challenges faced, will be and are already being impacted as well. These include energy, construction, transportation. Institutional economists know that markets, industries and business as going concerns need institutions to function. This is so much so, that it is easy to not notice their role, and mainstream economists in particular are wont to ignore how both formal as well as informal institutions undergird the economy (cf. Commons 1924; Dolfsma 2019). With fundamental transitions, well-established institutions many (all) need to be reconsidered and re-shaped, perhaps even at the same time (e.g. Fischer et al. 2022). Even though obsolete institutions can persist (Negru et al. 2022), a new, differently balanced ‘institutional furniture’ (Veblen [1906] 1961) supporting the transition to sustainability is to be created offering some degree of certainty needed for firms, industries and markets to function. Such an institutional infrastructure may not simply emerge, in time, spontaneously, led by market forces. ‘Institutional entrepreneurs’ of different hues may step in, for instance by forcing firms and governments to change through the courts (e.g., De Graaf & Jans 2015). Yet, much more guidance may be needed for an appropriate institutional furniture to form: what is a role for governments in that process? From an institutional economics point of view, an area of expertise uniquely positioned to understand the role of institutions and the need for justice, the following questions can potentially be addressed:

The focus this year is thus on the transition our economy and its firms and industries need to make, and how institutional economics can contribute to doing so while creating justice. Submissions on different topics that utilize the methods and approach of institutional economics are also welcome.

AFEE @ ASSA and AFEE @ ICAPE

The AFEE sessions at ASSA (10) as well as the AFEE sessions at ICAPE (4) are equally important. ICAPE ( the International Confederation of Associations for Pluralism in Economics) is a confederate association of which AFEE is a founding member; it is in pursuit of pluralism in economics. Submission of a paper or panel proposal implies agreeing with inclusion in either the AFEE @ ASSA or the AFEE @ ICAPE programme. The objective when putting together both programmes is to have high quality and coherent sessions and overall programmes that showcase diversity and offer insights that AFEE members and members of adjacent association will appreciate highly. Papers presented at the AFEE @ ASSA as well as the AFEE @ ICAPE sessions will both be eligible for publication in the June issue of the JEI (2025). AFEE @ ICAPE sessions must be approved by the Committee on Regional and International Conferences (CORIC).

Deadline: The submission deadline is 1 May 2024; late submissions will not be considered. Acceptance or rejection notices will be issued by early June.

Submissions

Please submit your individual proposals or panel proposals by email to wilfred.dolfsma@wur.nl. AFEE@ASSA sessions do not feature discussants – session participants and the session chair contribute to a lively discussion benefitting all participants to the session. A proposal for presentation of a paper or for presentation in a panel must include the following:

If you are proposing a panel (max. 5 contributors), please ensure that the required information about each individual contributor on the panel is submitted, and that the contributor includes with the submission the title of the panel and the panel organizer’s name. A proposed panel with fewer than 5 papers / contributors can see their proposed panel complemented with additional contributions.

June JEI

Papers presented at the AFEE meetings as well as in AFEE sessions at the ICAPE conference immediately subsequent to the ASSE meeting, both in San Francisco, are eligible for consideration for publication in the June issue of the JEI. To be considered for publication:

Questions or concerns? Email Wilfred Dilfsma: wilfred.dolfsma@wur.nl

Submission Deadline (Conference): 1 May 2024

Submission Deadline (JEI): 15 December 2024

21st STOREP Conference and YSI Pre-Conference (Milan, June 2024)

26-29 June 2024 | Milan, Italy

Conference Theme: "Why Inequalities Grow: Value and Distribution in the History of Economic Thought”

The 21st STOREP Conference, “Why Inequalities Grow: Value and Distribution in the History of Economic Thought”, will be held at the University of Milan, Department of Historical Studies, June 27-29, 2024.

The Conference will be preceded by the Young Scholars Initiative (YSI) pre-conference events (June 26-27, 2024). The conference aims to foster a debate on inequalities, where they come from, where they are going, and how they can be reduced. To devise new and effective policy approaches, the role of the State and policy-making institutions needs to be rethought within a pluralist, historical, and multidisciplinary perspective.

The last few decades have witnessed an increase in inequalities on most accounts. Inequality within countries worldwide, with very few exceptions, remains persistently high. And in advanced economies, where it is typically lower, it is on the rise almost everywhere. Some recent studies have managed perhaps to soften the picture, but certainly not to overturn it.

Inequality has many aspects and dimensions: income, wealth, opportunities, and access to basic goods or services, such as housing, water, healthcare, education, and technology. Inequality has many cleavages: it may be defined with respect to countries, regions, or individuals (vertical inequality) but also to ethnicity, religion, caste, gender, and sexuality (horizontal inequality). A peculiar form of inequality has gained prominence in recent years: the inequality between generations, particularly the impoverishment of future generations due to the depletion of natural resources and the increasing costs and risks associated with climate change.

As inequality has increased, so has the acceptance of inequality. Indeed, inequality has found a theoretical justification in neoclassical economics and practical support in neoliberal policies. The former justified inequality by showing, under its own assumptions, that each factor of production was remunerated in proportion to its marginal productivity and, thus, based on technical considerations. The latter supported inequality by reducing regulation, welfare, and income redistribution in the belief that this would stimulate competition, innovation, and efficiency. A particularly striking evidence of how pervasively and persuasively inequality has been made to appear acceptable is provided by the failure of the Swiss “99% initiative”: a referendum proposing to increase taxes on the wealthiest 1% of the population was rejected by over 65% of the voters. In contrast, distribution and its inherent conflicts were once the primary concern of political economy, as stated by David Ricardo at the beginning of his Principles: “To determine the laws which regulate this distribution, is the principal problem in Political Economy”.

The revival of inequality studies has come with a shift from functional to interpersonal distribution of income and wealth. To be sure, the distinction between classes (of workers, capitalists, and landowners) that characterized the analysis of classical economists may be less clear-cut today. Yet it remains relevant to distinguish different types of income because they have different sources, obey different laws, and largely still accrue predominantly to different social groups. Part of the income still comes from labor, part from enterprise, part from sheer power deriving from the ownership of scarce resources or previously accumulated wealth, part is justified by the assumption of risk, and part from financial speculation, the control of significant market share or barriers to entry and political or social influence.

The distinction between different types of revenues is still relevant to understanding where inequalities come from and how they are to be addressed. The history of economic thought can offer an important contribution to grasping why inequalities grow and how they can be mitigated.

Important dates for young scholars: Scholarships and Awards

The Review of Political Economy (ROPE) will consider selected papers presented at the STOREP Conference for publication.

The 21st STOREP Annual Conference aims to foster a debate on inequalities, where they come from, where they are going, and how they can be reduced. To devise new and effective policy approaches, the role of the State and policy-making institutions needs to be rethought within a pluralist, historical, and multidisciplinary perspective.

The Conference welcomes historical, theoretical, and empirical sessions and research papers addressing the different ways in which causes, consequences, and possible remedies have been framed in the history of economic thought. Particularly, it is eager to include studies that can help to understand the impact of COVID-19 and the recent wars, with a special focus on youths, women, and ethnic minorities. To this aim, the conference’s goal is to bring together scholars and leading experts belonging to different fields of the social sciences domain -such as economics and history of economic thought, economic history, sociology, law, demography, and geography- and from all over the world. Scholars from the Global South are especially encouraged to submit proposals and participate in the Conference.

Possible focuses of interest include, but are not limited to:

Paper proposals are welcome in all fields adopting historical and/or theoretical approaches from multiple perspectives (Marxian, Post Keynesian, Neo-Ricardian, Neo Schumpeterian, Institutional, Austrian economics, Stock-flow consistent and agent-based modeling, input-output analysis). Empirical approaches (both quantitative and qualitative) are considered, provided that they are appropriately framed in a historical or theoretical perspective.

Submission Process

Abstract and session proposals must be uploaded on the submission website of the conference – i.e. via the web-based software “Conference maker”. Please create an account by providing basic contact info and choosing a user ID/password to submit. If you signed up for a previous conference using Conference Maker, you can login with your existing user ID and password. Please follow the instructions here. Note that submitters have to add co-authors if any, once the proposal is submitted (by clicking on “Add/modify authors”).

Registration: All participants must become STOREP members or renew their membership: Conference Registration here

You can find all the information about the conference themes and information about the registration process here.

Submission Deadline: 31 March 2024

36th EAEPE Annual Conference on: Economics in a changing world. New perspectives to economic analysis and economic policy (Bilbao, September 2024)

4- 6 September 2024 | Bilbao

This year's annual conference of the European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy (EAEPE) will take place September 4-6 in Bilbao, Spain. The conference theme is "Economics in a changing world. New perspectives to economic analysis and economic policy", but paper proposals are welcome for the wide range of topics covered by the EAEPE Research Areas. You can find more information about the conference on the main conference website.

And more information about the the different research areas here.

If you are a young scholar, you may also check the EAEPE homepage for regular updates on the EAEPE Pre-Conference, an event that takes place directly before the main conference and that is meant to provide an explicit space for young scholars to network and exchange ideas.

1 March, 2024: Special session submission deadline

5 April, 2024: Abstract submission for individual papers deadline

3 May, 2024: Notification of abstract acceptance; registration opens; fee waiver application opens

31 May 2024: Early registration closes; Fee waiver application closes

28 June, 2024: Late registration closes (for authors to be included in the scientific programme)

25 August, 2024: Submission of full papers deadline

4th SDMRG International Workshop (hybrid, June 2024)

12-14 June 2024 | Brasília, Brazil/hybrid

The 4th (Structural Development Macroeconomics) SDMRG International Workshop is sponsored by the University of Brasília (UnB) and the Ministry of Science and Technology through the CNPq. It also has the support of the Regional Councils of Economics of the Federal District and the State of Goiás, as well as the Federal Council of Economics. This event represents a unique opportunity to discuss the latest research on various aspects of this complex project. It is naturally intended to foster diversity in the approach and methodology used to analyse processes of catching up and falling behind.

Previous editions of the workshop included topics such as the middle-income trap and the problem of ecological transition. This year, we propose a focus on premature deindustrialisation and climate change. The climate emergency is not only the greatest challenge of our generation, but it also requires global action. Recent events in the international landscape highlight the need to bring Global North and South perspectives together to generate win-win policy recommendations. The SDMRG is proud of putting together a series of lectures and parallel sessions to allow fruitful interaction between different generations of scholars and policymakers.

Main topics:

Keynote lectures, some special sessions, and ordinary sections will be in-person, while parallel sessions will happen in-person and virtually. The 4th edition of the workshop will also include a Minicourse on Behavioural Macroeconomics & Complex Systems with Marwil J. Davila-Fernandez. The Organising Committee thanks all participants and interested colleagues for their support in making this Online initiative possible.

To submit paper proposals please email an abstract (max 1000 words) with the question or issue to be addressed and an explanation of the approach to sdmrgworkshop2024@gmail.com.

Práticas de Administração Pública, Revista de Economia e História Econômica and PSL Quarterly Review will publish a selection of papers presented at the workshop.

Deadline for proposals for papers: 30 April 2024

Call for Proposals for a special issue in Revista de Economía Crítica (spain)

Call for Revista de Economía Crítica (REC) (Journal of Critical Economics)

Revista de Economía Crítica is the flagship journal of the Spanish Asociación de Economía Crítica (Critical Economics Association). It has been published since 2003, and it releases original research articles in the broad field of the different schools of thought in critical, heterodox, and/or radical political economy. The Editorial Board of the REC (https://www.revistaeconomiacritica.org/index.php/rec/about/editorialTeam) is considering publishing a new special issue, and to this end we are calling for proposals, both on topics and on guest editors. The theme of the special issue is open. Ideally, our intention is to address issues that, on the one hand, have not already been dealt with in a special issue (or in several independent articles) previously published in the REC (please note that all articles published since its inception are in Open Access, at no cost to readers or authors, and permanently available on the journal's website: https://www. revistaeconomiacritica.org/) and, on the other hand, that they deal with cutting-edge topics, even at the multi- and inter- disciplinary intersections with other fields of study, and that they represent a radically heterodox and critical approach to issues of current relevance, always with a connection to Political Economy.

As for the more practical issues, we kindly remind you of some key aspects:

Please send your special issue proposals by email to the Editor-in-Chief (Prof Jordi Roca, Universitat de Barcelona; jordiroca@ub.edu) with the subject 'REC special issue proposal'.

Conference: “From 1984 to 2024: industrial disputes and social movements in the United Kingdom since the Great Miners’ Strike” (Lille, March 2024)

5 March 2024 | Science Po, Lille, France

Conference Theme: “From 1984 to 2024: industrial disputes and social movements in the United Kingdom since the Great Miners’ Strike”

We are delighted to circulate the programme of a one-day conference to be held in Sciences Po Lille on Wednesday, March 6 2024. The conference is entitled "From 1984 to 2024: industrial disputes and social movements in the UK since the Great Miners' Strike" and will take place on the fortieth anniversary of the beginning of this major industrial dispute of recent British history. Attendance to the conference is free but registrationis mandatory.

The conference is a prelude to a special issue of the French Journal of British Studies (RFCB ) on the same theme. The Call for Papers for this issue is still open and can be read in full here; papers are expected for May 31st, 2024. Titles and abstracts should be sent to

This CFP concerns submissions:

Please see below for the submission guidelines for the one-day conference and the journal issue.

The one-day conference and journal issue focus on the past four decades of industrial disputes and social movements in the UK. The year 2024 is indeed the 40th anniversary of the beginning of the Great Miners’ Strike of 1984-1985. As such, it provides an opportunity to study social protest in the UK since 1984.

This fortieth anniversary allows for several reflexive operations. First, one can look at the 1984-2024 period as a whole, and identify dynamics of social protest in the UK since the Great Miners’ Strike. Then, taking as a starting point the strike wave that began in the Winter of 2022 and comparing the early 2020s with the early 1980s, one may survey the transformations undergone by the UK over the past four decades. Finally, the 2024 anniversary calls for a reflection on the commemorations of the Great Miners’ Strike. It has become one of the main sites of memory [lieux de mémoire] (Nora, 1989) of the British trade-union movement, but has also become a point of reference for other social movements.

This anniversary therefore serves both as the driver of a series of questions on the recent history of social struggle in the UK, and as a heuristic device for observers of contemporary British society. The journal issue intends to encourage retrospective, bird-eye views on the variegated forms of social protest since the watershed of the Great Miners’ Strike, as well as to shed light on the current conjuncture, by identifying parallels and differences between now and 1984.

The outline that follows offers to contributors a series of reflections, whose aim is to spark discussion rather than foreclose it. It does not intend to exhaust the possible interrogations and objects of study relating to these forty years of strife in the UK. While some hypotheses are offered, contributions tackling this field of inquiry from perspectives omitted in this CFP will be welcome.

Contributions may focus on the following questions or more:

Submission guidelines

This is a two-step project:

Taking part in the March 6th conference is neither a condition for nor a guarantee of publication in the French Journal of British Studies/RFCB journal issue. Both abstracts and subsequent articles should be sent to Clémence Fourton (Sciences Po Lille, CECILLE: clemence.fourton@sciencespo-lille.eu) and Marc Lenormand (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, EMMA: Marc.Lenormand@univ-montp3.fr)

Registration Deadline: 6 March 2024

Submission Deadline: 31 May 2024

Extendend Deadline: 26th Annual Conference of the Association for Heterodox Economics (Bristol, July 2024)

10-12 July 2024 | University of the West of England (Frenchay Campus), Bristol, UK

Please note that the deadline for papers and panel submissions for the 26th AHE Annual Conference has now been extended until Friday, 1st March 2024.

The conference will take place on July 10-12, 2024 at the University of the West of England (Frenchay Campus), in Bristol (UK), also welcoming online contributions (hybrid presentations). This is an event organised in collaboration with Bristol Research in Economics at UWE, College of Business and Law.

To submit an individual paper (max 300 words abstract), please fill out this form.

For a panel submission (a closed panel with 3-4 presentations), please fill out this form.

You can find more information about the conference on our webpage: www.hetecon.net/

Extended Submission Deadline: 1 March 2024

HM and IRI New York Conference (New York, May 2024)

31 May-2 June 2024 | New York, USA

Conference theme: No War but the Class War

Historical Materialism and Institute for the Radical Imagination Conference invite submissions for papers to be presented at the 2024 conference.

The ongoing proliferation of violent conflicts and antagonisms has once again brought the question of warfare to the forefront. Unfortunately, the dominant discourse that has accompanied these antagonisms is simplistic moralism; war as a matter of good and evil. Relatedly, anti-war movements in the United States and beyond have waned, the fight against 'evil' overcoming all else. The startling lack of critical perspectives on and mass social movements against these recent and ongoing wars (from Afghanistan, Syria, Ukraine, Gaza and the West Bank, to Yemen, Sudan, and beyond) as well as increasingly possible future wars (China, Russia) is a direct consequence of the Manichean perspective that has dominated the understanding of the many (including some on the left). Equally worryingly, the broader disruptions and impact of these wars, from rising poverty in the global south to the displacement of tens of millions of people, has not been adequately understood as one of the consequences of these ongoing antagonisms.

It is against this backdrop that a return to a more analytical and rigorous understanding of conflict and war is needed. More precisely, a class analysis of conflict and antagonism is necessary for understanding the complexity of these conflicts and the social conditions that engender them. The analysis of class is always concurrently an analysis of movement and struggle, there is no class without war and there is no war without class. Thus, a class analysis of war also makes visible the deeper social agencies and stakes of these conflicts, highlighting the importance of anti-war movements as well as the necessity of class struggles from below. Similarly, a class analysis shows which conflicts extend and deepen the control and interests of the capitalist classes and which conflicts combat capitalism and benefit the working and other subaltern classes.

As in the past, the conference ethos is strictly egalitarian. This means everyone is invited to contribute in a comradely spirit, the conference is open to all currents of critical Marxist theory and we expect all presenters to attend the entire conference, not just their own session (with no ‘cameo appearances’). We also expect all speakers to make themselves available for the whole period of the conference for their sessions (with only completely immutable circumstances constituting exceptions), as tailoring a conference of this size around individuals’ preferences and desires is not feasible or desirable. The conference is an important part of the broader Historical Materialism project – including the journal, the book series, and the global network of HM conferences – and we want to encourage all conference participants to get involved with these different elements, for example by subscribing to the journal and submitting their conference paper to us for consideration. The Institute for the Radical Imagination is based in New York City and sponsors various seminars and classes through the year, including a yearly Marxist Summer School. It also publishes the journal Situations.

In line with the central theme of this year’s conference, we particularly want to invite contributions on the following non-exclusive questions:

Please note that individual papers and panels should include:

Decisions on early submissions will be available for those who need extra time for arranging their travel or for applying for institutional support. The organizational committee of Historical Materialism New York 2024 can be reached at: HM.IRI.NYC@gmail.com.

Deadline for submissions: 1 March 2024

Historical Materialism Cluj-Napoca Conference: Polycrisis across Divides (Cluj-Napoca, August 2024)

29-31 August 2024 | Cluj-Napoca, Romania

This conference is organised under the aegis of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory, which supports a journal a book series, and Marxist conferences across the globe. The conference is part of the PHILSE project run by Janovics Center for Screen and Performing Arts Studies at BBU Cluj-Napoca.

That we live in a state of permanent polycrisis is a well-established truth: ecological crisis, economic depressions, political failure, social breakdown, wars, and pandemics have all been piling up, intersecting and escalating one another in implacable ways. What is less clear is the way in which this complex global polycrisis is articulated and manifesting in the various sub-components of the world system, across the divides of this multipolar and multi-imperialist world capitalist formation. Particularly, but not exclusively, this first Historical Materialism conference in Eastern Europe will be interested in the specific place of the region in today’s polycritical world: what is the role of the old “Second World” in today’s global context dominated by a still hegemonic and expanding (while also retreating) First World and a fragmented, dominated, yet increasingly assertive Global South? But also, what is the place and meaning of the former socialist bloc in the global history of Marxism, critical theory and social movements? Which of its legacies are worth rediscovering, resurrecting, or instead should be discontinued?

Besides the streams covering problematics pertaining to Eastern Europe, the conference welcomes presentations and panels on all the traditional themes and topics of the Historical Materialism series, as well as discussions on the most pressing and critical aspects of today’s world, with a particular emphasis on materialist readings of recent developments in media, technology & popular culture.

Submission Process

Whilst we encourage papers and panels that address these themes, the Historical Materialism Cluj Conference seeks to provide a space for critical Marxist theory and research across the globe and the range of disciplines and interests. Other papers and panels that enrich Marxist understandings – historical and contemporary – of theory and philosophy, culture, politics, political economy and societies under modern capitalism are also welcome.

The organizational committee of Historical Materialism Cluj 2024 can be reached at hmcluj2024@gmail.com.

Please note that individual papers and panels should include:

We still believe that this particular format of the in-person conference offers a unique and irreplaceable form that brings together comrades, enables discussion, helps the dissemination of new and original research, creates research networks and communities, and builds solidarity. This is why we will not normally accept online presentations. We would also note that we do engage in online broadcasts and podcasts all year round for such sessions.

As in the past, the conference ethos is strictly egalitarian. This means everyone is invited to contribute in a comradely spirit, the conference is open to all currents of critical Marxist theory and we expect all presenters to attend the entire conference, not just their own session (with no ‘cameo appearances’). The conference is an important part of the broader Historical Materialism project – including the journal, the book series, and the global network of HM conferences – and we want to encourage all conference participants to get involved with these different elements, for example by submitting their conference paper to the journal.

Conference streams:

More information on the individual streams and the conference in general is available on the official website.

Deadline for abstracts: 1 April 2024

Inaugural UK Modern Monetary Theory Conference (Leeds, July 2024)

15-17 July 2024 | The University of Leeds

Background

The Gower Initiative for Modern Money Studies was launched in 2018 and is part of an international movement challenging the economic orthodoxy of the last four decades. Its founders came together through a common concern that the dominant economics of our day is deeply flawed. To that end, the primary aim of GIMMS is education that provides the tools to enable people to understand that the state of the public finances per se is not a limiting factor in government spending, and that the central question revolves around the development and distribution of real resources, along with the political nature of those decisions. GIMMS’ mandate is to challenge the household budget narrative of the state finances that dominates the daily political and media discourse and to encourage a discussion about the full range of government’s priorities and policy options and how best they can serve the public purpose.

The Gower Initiative for Modern Money Studies is delighted to announce the inaugural UK Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) Conference to be held at The University of Leeds from July 15 to 17, 2024.

This groundbreaking event will feature Warren Mosler, author of ‘Soft Currency Economics’ (1993), the publication of which became the basis for what has become popularised as Modern Monetary Theory. Warren will be our special guest and the first-day keynote speaker, and will attend all three days, participating and providing critical analysis in multiple sessions.

Call for Papers

Scholars, researchers, and practitioners are invited to submit papers on themes consistent with MMT understanding of economic thought with a particular emphasis on critical reviews of Warren Mosler’s economic insights and published work available to view via Mosler Economics.

First day

The first day of the conference will be dedicated to papers reviewing and critically engaging with Mosler’s extensive body of work. Suggested topics for critical evaluation are:

Second day

The second day of the conference welcomes academic papers that align with MMT principles on a broader spectrum. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

Abstracts of 300 to 600 words for both critical evaluations of Mosler’s work and general MMT-consistent papers should be submitted by March 1, 2024.

Third Day – Practical Application of MMT to Real-World Policies:

The third day of the conference shifts focus to the practical application of MMT insights to real-world policies. This day is designed to be inclusive of diverse disciplines. We warmly invite contributors to engage in workshops and breakout sessions, fostering collaborative discussions on matters pivotal to contemporary challenges. Some key areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

Further suggestions for workshops, short presentations and breakout sessions should be submitted by March 1, 2024.

This inclusive day is a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration, where diverse perspectives can converge to explore how MMT understandings can contribute practically to addressing the pressing challenges of our time. Join us in shaping a dialogue that bridges the theoretical foundations of MMT with the tangible applications needed to drive meaningful change.

Submission Guidelines:

We look forward to an enriching exchange of ideas, critiques, and practical applications during this three-day event. Join us in advancing the discourse on Modern Monetary Theory and exploring its potential impact on shaping economic policies.

To submit abstracts please contact the conference organisers via email abstracts@mmtconference.uk To receive updates about the conference please email info@mmtconference.uk. For further information please visit the website.

Submissions Deadline: 1 March 2024

International Conference on "The Miners’ Strike in Britain in 1984/5" (Bochum, March 2025)

20-21 March 2025 | Bochum, Germany

Conference theme: The Miners’ Strike in Britain in 1984/5 – New Perspectives

The miners’ strike of 1984/5 is regarded as a seminal event in contemporary British history. The strike pitted Britain’s most iconic group of workers, organised in the National Union of Mineworkers, and led by Arthur Scargill, against the Conservative government under Margaret Thatcher. The government drew on the full resources of the state – ranging from the police to the courts to public relations – to ‘contain, isolate and defeat’ the striking miners in twelve grueling months of attrition.

The international conference, to be held at the Institute for Social Movements in Bochum, aims to evaluate critically the existing historiography and to sketch avenues for future research. In this call for papers, we invite contributions of original research addressing diverse economic, social, cultural and political dimensions of the strike and its aftermath. These include but are not necessarily restricted to:

Please submit a short abstract (c. 200 words) of your proposed paper, and a one-page CV to Stefan Berger at stefan.berger@rub.de. The deadline for submissions is 15 March 2024. We expect to be able to cover travel and accommodation costs for all invited delegates.

More information is available on the official website.

Deadline for abstract submissions: 15 March 2024

Ola Financiera: Special issue on "Economics from a Gender perspective"

The recent Nobel Prize awarded to Claudia Goldin is an example of the importance of approaching the study of women from the perspective of financial economics. From the perspective of feminist economics and financial economics, Ola Financiera announces a special issue on the gender inequalities evidenced by Covid-19 and the post-pandemic. The lockdown crisis highlighted the importance of women's role in social reproduction and the care economy, as well as the gaps and opportunities that have been lagging because of the austerity policies implemented within the framework of the Washington Consensus. Feminist economics has provided theoretical and empirical knowledge from the incursion of economics as a science of provisioning beyond the study of scarce resources.

Hence the importance of having our own, original and well-founded approach from the perspective of heterodox feminist and financial economics to offer a space for reflection to the national and regional scientific world with the tools and knowledge necessary to develop ideas and policies capable of facing the challenges of development.

For the UNAM, this joint effort between the Faculty of Economics and the Institute of Economic Research is the product of years of dedication to the research, teaching and dissemination and dissemination of financial economics.

It is in this context that the journal Ola Financiera cordially invites the international academic community -including students- to join this task and participate with us by sending original and unpublished articles to be part of our Vol. 17 No. 48 May August 2024, which will be dedicated to addressing economics from a gender perspective.

We believe that in the changing world it is increasingly difficult to study any topic without analyzing the issue of gender, so we seek to delve into its many implications. Our aim in this issue is to analyze the dimensions of gender in economic dynamics based on women in the context of societies that aspire to greater equality.

Articles that contribute to the expansion of scientific research and its dissemination on topics of contemporary financial economics with issues that include economics and gender, including although not limited to

Original and unpublished articles can be submitted for double-blind peer review no later than April 19, 2024 to the following e-mail address: ola.financiera.unam@gmail.com

Consult the editorial criteria and Publication Instructions to which articles must adhere for publication, at the following link:

https://www.revistas.unam.mx/index.php/ROF/about/submissions

The journal's website can be found at the following link:
http://www.olafinanciera.unam.mx/

https://www.revistas.unam.mx/index.php/ROF

Royal Geographical Society: Session on "Knowledge Creation in Finance" (London, August 2024)

27- 30 August | London, UK

RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2024 is looking forward to receiving your proposals for the conference programme at this year's conference. The submission portal for the conference programme is now open - please see our guidance for presenters and our guidance for session organisers. The conference will be chaired by Professor Stephen Legg (University of Nottingham), with the theme of Mapping. AIC2024 will take place in London at the Society and Imperial College London, and online, from Tuesday 27 to Friday 30 August 2024. If you have any questions, please contact ac2024@rgs.org.

Session title: Knowledge Creation in Finance @ RGS Annual Conference 2024

Organiser: Dr. Stefanos Ioannou, Oxford Brookes University

This session aims at exploring the various processes of knowledge creation in finance, and their implications. Knowledge creation takes place in various scales, from the micro to the macro. It is central in shaping financial relationships, narratives, and outcomes. At the level of day-to-day interactions, the creation of tacit knowledge enables trust, reputation, and a shared business culture among those working in financial and advanced business services (FABS), thus being a centripetal force in the formation of financial centres. At the meso- and macro- levels, it is a contested process, reflecting the influence of various institutions. Credit rating agencies, for example, shape conventional knowledge as to what constitutes prudent financing. Their positioning in knowledge creation is not about whether their view is right or wrong, but about their ability to determine what goes as such. Same holds with regards to the antagonism of various institutions, public and private, to determine what goes as green financing.

Aim of this session is to further explore the ways in which knowledge is created in finance. An indicative, though not exhaustive, list of questions to address are as follows:

Contributions to this session can be qualitative or quantitative. Interdisciplinary contributions are particularly welcome. For questions and abstract submissions (approx. 200 words) please contact Stefanos Ioannou (email: sioannou@brookes.ac.uk).

Submission Deadline: 25 February 2024

Call for Participants

Marxist Summer School 2024 (Kasos, July 2024)

2-16 July 2024 | Island of Kasos, Greece

The Institute for the Radical Imagination is pleased to announce the 2024 Marxist Summer School. The Summer School will take place from July 2nd through July 16th on the Greek island of Kasos. The Marxist Summer School is designed to enable those new to historical materialism and more advanced participants to address fundamental questions, concepts, and texts in an intensive way and in an inclusive, non-sectarian, and congenial setting. There will be one daily mid-day seminar session, 12-2, and one evening session every other day, 7-9, (held in the Kasos municipal library) where participants will collaborate on close readings of texts and address some of the core political problems of our times: from racialization, war, the transformation of desire and subjectivity, and the materialist study of history, to the crisis of democracy, imperialism and accumulation by dispossession, and the requisites for revolutionary practice.

The Marxist Summer School is open to everyone with intellectual drive and revolutionary zeal and does not require any previous preparation. Students can register on the Institute website. There is a non-refundable registration fee of $500, and an additional $1000 is due by the end of May. The tuition includes a single occupancy hotel room (there can be reduced rates for those who want to share a room) and one communal meal each day. There will be a maximum of 30 students in total – some financial aid may be available for students on a need basis.

Kasos is a very small island with about 800 residents. It has very little tourism and is an ideal location for engaging in collaborative study and radical thinking. There are a few beaches within walking distance from where you will be staying, as well as various small cafes, bars, and tavernas. There are daily flights to Kasos from Rhodes and Karpathos as well as multiple ferry boats from Piraeus each week (connecting through the islands of Crete, Rhodes, and Karpathos); ferry boat tickets from Piraeus start at about 60 euros.

Seminar Themes

Midday Seminar Week 1 - Class and Race in Capitalism: This seminar will examine the question of how class, race, and their relation should be conceived in the era of capitalism, as well as the function of racism in sustaining capitalism, while addressing the enduring pertinence of Marx’s work in theorizing these questions. Individual sections will also focus on specific cases of racialization: of the Irish, of Southern Italians, and of Blacks in the USA.

Midday Seminar Week 2 - Politics in the Time of Oligarchy, Exploitation, and War: This seminar will explore the ways that the narrowing concentration of political power and the means of physical coercion are working against the struggle for democracy and human dignity. Readings will include works by Niccolo Machiavelli, Wendy Brown, Antonio Negri, Cornelius Castoriadis, and C. Wright Mills.

Evening Seminar Weeks 1 & 2 - The German Ideology: A close reading of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engel's The German Ideology, with a focus on the materialist conception of history, the role of ideology in reproduction, and the production of revolutionary practice. Supplementary texts will include works by Herbert Marcuse and Louis Althusser.

Faculty for 2024:

For additional information, please visit the next link or contact Peter Bratsis.

19th edition of the Advanced Course on "Innovation, Growth, International Production. Models and Data Analysis" (Rome, May 2024)

6-10 May 2024 | Sapienza University of Rome, Italy

The 19th edition of the Advanced Course on Innovation, Growth, International Production. Models and Data Analysis will take place at the Faculty of Economics, Sapienza University of Rome on 6-10 May 2024.

The Course is organized by Sapienza University of Rome, University of Urbino Carlo Bo and Scuola Normale Superiore, in collaboration with Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Marche Polytechnic University, Roma Tre University and the Institute for New Economic Thinking YSI. It is intended for Ph.D. students, post-docs and young scholars.

Delivered in English, the course covers a wide range of topics, including innovation, artificial intelligence, growth, global value chains, and structural change. It integrates theoretical lectures with presentations of empirical research and practical sessions using STATA software. This year, the course also features the presentation of Giovanni Dosi's book The Foundations of Complex Evolving Economies.

The deadline for applications is 1 April 2024. Early bird applications by 10 March 2024 will be considered for partial YSI scholarships. Preference will be given to participants who reside outside of the EU, with attention to the geographical distance from Rome.

For more information and registration details, visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 1 April 2024

1st AHE Webinar on "Heterodox Economics and the Political Economy of Palestine" (London, February 2024)

19 February 2024, 12pm EST | online

Webinar Series Theme: Heterodox economics in the real world: scholarship, policy and activism

Webinar 1: Heterodox Economics and the Political Economy of Palestine

In collaboration with the Union for Radical Political Economy (URPE)

Heterodox economics crucially involves uncovering and challenging unequal power relations, including those related to class, colonialism, imperialism, race and gender. AHE has expressed its unwavering solidarity with the Palestinian people that are facing Israeli occupation and an ongoing genocidal war (see AHE’s and URPE’s 2023 statements on Palestine). It is the task of us as critical scholars to expose and challenge the power relations that support oppressive structures and stand on the side of the oppressed.

At the moment media reporting on Palestine is heavily dominated by Zionist narratives and the focus is only on the immediate humanitarian emergency. This webinar takes an alternative heterodox and radical political economy perspective on Palestine, both from a scholarly and activist point of view. It explores the historical and socio-economic reasons for the current genocide, the possible role of heterodox economics in studying the Palestinian economy and society, and the likely paths going forward.

Speaker: Dr Ibrahim Shikaki, Assistant Professor of Economics, Trinity College, US.

Discussants

Registration

Register for the zoom meeting here

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

4th EoF School: Capitals and Capabilities in the On-life Era (online, monthly sessions)

March - September 2024 | online

webinar theme: "Capitals and Capabilities in the On-life Era"

We are happy to invite you to the 4th edition of the EoF School, a cycle of free online webinars organized by the Economy of Francesco. This year's title is "Capitals and Capabilities in the On-life Era". Keynote speakers will be Martha Nussbaum, Sir Angus Deaton, Luigino Bruni, and many others. The lectures will be live-streamed monthly on Zoom. Registration is required.

The global economy is in constant transformation. The same applies to the language we employ to categorize and understand economic, social, and environmental issues. The meaning that concepts such as inequality, poverty, capital, sustainability, and others have today is not the same as twenty years ago. As Pope Francis stated many times, reality always exceeds ideas. One of the worldwide central elements of transformation is the digital revolution. Human and non-human experiences have been significantly impacted by the advent of the internet and, more recently, of AI systems. The 4th edition of the EoF School focuses on this change, inquiring about one topic that, in the previous year, has been at the core of EoF community reflections: the various forms of capital (spiritual, relational, social, economic, environmental, and so on) and, as a complement, the notion of capabilities (basic human functionings). In his last address to the EoF community, the Pope invited to find the ‘unity of the opposites’ of the contemporary global economy. The opposition between real and digital life, online and offline, does not capture people’s experience worldwide. Today, we live in the on-life era, where the digital and the real reciprocally affect each other. Therefore, the 4th EoF school will address the following question: what capitals do we need to address the problems of the on-life era? What are the on-life capabilities that are constitutive of human experience? Through the inquiry into the new-old forms of capitals and capabilities, we aim to understand how to address global problems such as inequalities, discrimination, misery, exclusion, and many others.

EoF young people’s vocation to fight manifested injustices and give a soul to the world economy has not changed. Therefore, it is urgent to understand how to decline it in the on-life era.

Please find a link to the registration form here. For more information, please visit the EoF School page here.

Deadline for registration: 1 March 2024

EAERE Summer School on Data Science in Environmental Economics Research (Austria, June 2024)

22-28 June 2024 | Austria

The 2024 EAERE summer school is open for applications! This year’s program will focus on the intersection of environmental economics and data science.

We will deal with topics such as machine learning, spatial statistics and data analysis, remote sensing, and the use of "alternative data". Our distinguished faculty members will include:

Today, the availability of data coming from numerous different sources and formats, e.g.; remote sensing data, geospatial data, very large and/or high frequency datasets, allows to empirically analyze problems in environmental economics in an unpreceded detail. In order to process and use this data, a large set of different tools need to be applied. The 2024 EAERE summer school will focus on the intersection of environmental economics and data science, with a particular emphasis on the increasing use of data science and novel statistical methods in environmental economics research. This includes the use of machine learning, spatial statistics and data analysis, remote sensing, the use of "alternative data" and big data applications. The goal of the summer school is to address new developments in these fields, to highlight their potential applications in environmental economics, and to foster the implementation of novel empirical methods in environmental economics research.

The organizers would like to thank the Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences and the Field of Excellence - Climate Change Graz for their support.

The summer school will take place from 22 to 28 June 2024 in Castle Seggau, close to Graz, Styria, Austria.

Important dates

For more information, please see the next link.

Details on the application process can be found here.

Deadline application: 14th March 2024

Summer School in Advanced Methods for Economics and Political Economy (Leeds, June 2024)

24-28 June 2024 | University of Leeds, UK

Summer School Theme: "Beyond the Optimising Agent: Summer School in Advanced Methods for Economics and Political Economy"

This summer school provides training in advanced methods for Economics and Political Economy with practical applications. It focusses on theoretical and empirical methods beyond constrained optimisation that capture features such as uncertainty, instability, complexity, institutions, and historical change. In this way, the school provides methods that receive less attention in standard economics programmes but are essential to analyse real-world issues such as financial cycles, climate change, social inequality, and much more.

What will be covered?

The school covers both analytical foundations in the form of lectures as well as applications through hands-on computer-lab exercises and interactive group work. A variety of different methods are introduced, both quantitative and qualitative (see tentative programme below). Concrete applications illustrate how participants can apply these methods in their own research.

Who can participate?

The summer school is targeted at PhD students (or PGRs) and Early Career Researchers (up to 3 years since completion of PhD). In exceptional cases, we will also consider applications from postgraduate students.

Pre-requisites

There are no formal pre-requisites. However, note that the focus is on advanced methods, some of which will naturally build on more elementary methods we won’t have time to review.

This is an indicative list of methods or skills the school will build on:

Successful applicants will receive a reading list and a set of optional exercises to prepare for the summer school in advance.

Accommodation and participation fees

Tickets with accommodation include a private room in the accommodation at Storm Jameson Court, University of Leeds Campus (a few minutes walking distance from where the summer school will take place).

International travel scholarships and fee waivers

We encourage applications from scholars from low- and middle-income countries (see World Bank classification here) for whom we provide two international travel scholarships of up to 1,000 GBP each. In addition, we provide a limited number of fee waivers for participants without access to funding from their institution. Please indicate on the application form if you want to be considered for an international travel scholarship or a fee waiver.

Organising Team and Support

The summer school is jointly organised by the Department of Economics at the University of Leeds and the Institute of Political Economy, Governance, Finance and Accountability (PEGFA) at the University of Greenwich. We are grateful for financial support from the Young Scholar Initiative (YSI) at the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET).

Programme

Monday, 09:00 – 13:00 (Lecture + lab session):

(1) Structural Macroeconomic Models

Rafael Wildauer (Greenwich)

Causality in economic models, causal graphs, structural models of demand, distribution and conflict inflation, using software for numerical simulations.

Software: R

Monday, 14:00 – 18:00 (Lecture + lab session)

(2) Dynamic Models

Karsten Kohler (Leeds)

Systems of difference equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, stability vs instability, cycles, balanced growth, chaos.

Software: R

Tuesday, 09:00 – 13:00 (Lecture + lab session):

(3) Stock-flow Consistent Modelling and its Ecological Applications

Maria Nikolaidi (Greenwich)

Macroeconomic modelling, climate change, steady-state analysis, calibration.

Software: R

Tuesday, 14:00 – 18:00 (Lecture + lab session):

(4) Input-Output Analysis. An Overview of the Framework and Model Extensions

Alessandra Celani (Paris, OECD)

Technical coefficient matrices, multipliers, inter-country input-output tables, global value chain participation indicators, environmentally extended input–output models, structural decomposition analysis.

Software: R

Wednesday, 09:00 – 13:00 (Lecture + lab session):

(5) Agent-based Models

Luca Fierro
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis)

Foundational issues, model design and analysis, calibration/estimation, applications to financial markets, environment and macroeconomics.

Software: R

Wednesday, 14:00 – 18:00 (Lecture + lab session):

(6) Macroeconometrics

Karsten Kohler (Leeds) & Rafael Wildauer (Greenwich)

Modelling macroeconomic time series, auto-regressive distributed lag models, vector auto-regressive models, local projections, identification.

Software: Stata

Thursday, 09:00 – 13:00 (Lecture + lab session):

(7) Panel Data Methods. Difference-in-Difference Estimation and Extensions

Leila Gautham (Leeds)

Two-way fixed effects, event studies, synthetic control methods, and shift-share research designs.

Software: Stata

Thursday, 14:00 – 18:00 (Lecture + lab session):

8) Case Studies and Causal Inference

Jennifer Churchill (UWE Bristol)

When to do case studies, what to hope for from case studies, systematising case study analysis: methods of process tracing and qualitative comparative analysis.

Software: R

Friday, 09:00 – 13:00 (Lecture + lab session):

(9) Conducting Interviews in Economic Research

Bianca Orsi (Leeds)

Rationale for interviews in economic research; conduct and analysis of interviews (e.g. sampling, avoiding bias, coding, making sense of interview material).

Software: Nvivo

Friday, 14:00 – 18:00 (Lecture + lab session):

(10) Taking stock: Where Do We Go From Here?

How to apply

Fill in this application form: https://forms.gle/itZZS9DUgUzMF3xh6

Application deadline: 1 April 2024

Summer School on "Markets and Governments: a Theoretical Appraisal" (Rome, June 2024)

19-21 June 2024 | Villa Mondragone, Rome, Italy

Second Edition: Inequality, the design of markets and redistribution

The discipline of economics occupies a central role in the social sciences. Its conclusions are a key reference in public discussions. From a theoretical point of view, however, the foundations of the discipline appear far from being unambiguously established. Its basic prescriptions rest on assumptions which still deserve to be more fully understood and explicitly discussed. The MGTA initiative attempts at reexamining a very classic theme in economic thought, the tension between markets and governments, from the perspective of contemporary economic theory.

This year’s summer school will focus on inequality, the design of markets and redistribution.

Market outcomes are shaped by inequalities. Individuals come to the market with differences in skills and productive abilities that reflect differences in socioeconomic backgrounds, the lottery at birth. They also come to the market with differences in preferences, on how much of their time they want to sell for money, what their consumptions style should be and also in their views on the desirability of political interference with market outcomes.

The design of markets determines to what extent differences in preferences, abilities, income and wealth are amplified or moderated. For instance, the market power of firms affects how much consumers have to pay for goods and services and how much money the recipients of capital income can make. Governments frequently interfere to reach more equitable market outcomes.

This year’s summer school will discuss the principles that justify such interventions. It will also look at drivers of inequality in market-based societies, and, moreover, it will consider the question how markets and public policy should be designed in response.

The school aims at offering a critical review of all these issues. We will alternate traditional lectures by academics who have contributed to different areas of contemporary economic theory, with discussions around the presentation of recently published texts. In particular, the school aims to provide an opportunity to contrast contemporary economic theory with recent developments in political philosophy.

Application Process

We expect to accommodate a maximum of seventy participants at the school. Interested participants should apply by filling the registration form. The deadline for applying to the school is March 15th, 2024. Acceptance decisions will be communicated by April 3rd, 2024.

To ensure effective participation, and to guarantee that the available seats will actually be filled, the school requires a registration fee of 200 euros. However, we are pleased to announce the availability of several scholarships that will guarantee exemption from the tuition, for all the successful applicants without research funds.

For more information about the programme and registration, please visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 15 March 2024

UMass Boston Social @ EEA Conference (Boston, March 2024)

1 March 2024 | Boston, MA, US

The UMass Boston MA Program in Applied Economics and the UMass Boston Economics Department are hosting our traditional social gathering during the Eastern Economic Association Conference.

When: Friday, March 1 at 5:30-8:30 PM

Where: Democracy Brewing, 35 Temple Place, Boston, MA 02111

This will be a cash bar and some buffet style food will be provided.

Workshop: "Green Capitalism and its Alternatives: the Place of Class in Ecological Transitions" (hybrid, March 2024)

19 March 2024 | Muirhead Tower 420, University of Birmingham, UK and online (a link will be shared with those who register shortly before the event)

Workshop Theme: Green Capitalism and its Alternatives: the Place of Class in Ecological Transitions

Please find the programme of the workshop Green Capitalism and its Alternatives on the official website. It will be both in presence (at the University of Birmingham) and online, you can register at the linked page!

Fossil capitalism has generated the current ecological crisis and, so far, the COP has not managed to ensure a decline in greenhouse gas emissions. However, particularly after the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, the promise of green capitalism has gathered new momentum, energised by an uptick in the installation of renewables, driven forward by the rise of electric cars, and managed through advanced digital technologies. There are nonetheless reasons for scepticism. In fact, market-driven attempts at ecological transitions, even if increasingly coordinated by states, focus on technological innovations in a way that risks deepening the pervasive commodification of nature, environmentally destructive productivism, and steep inequalities. So far, the energy transition has actually been an energy expansion, in which renewables do not substitute fossil fuels but simply co-exist with them, and the damages of “green” extractivism are simply added to the climate change engendered by burning hydrocarbons. Are there alternatives? And, if so, what is the role of class – understood in intersectional and non-reductionist ways, that account for its racialised and gendered dimensions – in shaping different visions?

FIRST SESSION – 2pm - 3.45pm

Jack Copley (University of Durham) - “The Contradictions of Steel Decarbonisation”

Lorenzo Feltrin (University of Birmingham) – “In and Against the Ecological Crisis: Working-Class Environmentalism between Workplace and Community”

Lisa Tilley (SOAS, London) – “Indonesian Nickel Sovereignty and Global Raced Finance: The Meanings of Element 28 in an Age of Transition”

Fayrouz Yousfi (Ghent University) - “Crisis in the Fields: Neoliberal Agricultural Policies and Rural Discontent in Morocco”

SECOND SESSION – 4pm - 5.45pm

Patrick Bresnihan and Naomi Millner (Maynooth University and University of Bristol - Presenting the book All We Want is the Earth: Land, Labour and Movements Beyond Environmentalism)

Hamza Hamouchene (Transnational Institute - Presenting the book Dismantling Green Colonialism: Energy and Climate Justice in the Arab Region)

David Bailey (University of Birmingham) - Discussant

Gökçe Yeniev (University of Bristol) - Discussant

For registration and more information, please visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 19 March 2024

 AEMS Summer University on "Alternative Economic and Monetary System" (Online, March 2024)

15 July - 2 August 2024 | online

The interdisciplinary AEMS Summer University welcomes students and professionals from all fields and focuses on alternatives to the economic status quo. The program follows an interdisciplinary and holistic approach: International participants deal with limits to growth, as well as the instabilities of our financial system and learn why a drastic system change is necessary to stabilize the world climate – but most importantly: they discuss an array of alternative approaches, such as ethical banking, Circular Economy, the Economy for the Common Good, Degrowth and many more!

Please apply for Scholarships via www.summer-university.net | Early Bird application until 10 March 2024!

Do you have some questions left open? Join the free Online Info Session on 5 February at 2pm. – Registration via Eventbrite. The next Info Session will take place on 6 March.

Deadline Application: 10 March 2024

Conference Papers, Reports, and Podcasts

Association for Social Economics Podcast Series

ASE has been conducting interviews with heterodox scholars who engage in social economic research. The third season of "Social Economics" is dedicated to what social economics is about and highlights the contributions of junior and senior scholars to the field.

The podcast series can be accessed at the following link.

Job Postings

Bielefeld University, Germany (1/3)

job title: PhD Position 1: the role of crisis anticipation in Germany's social security system

The project SoSiKri (Soziale Sicherung im Krisenmodus; "Social Security in a Crisis Mode") is looking to fill three PhD positions. The junior research group (which is funded by the Fördernetzwerk Interdisziplinäre Sozialpolitikforschung/Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, Germany) explores how scenarios of ecological crises influence social policy - its institutions and reform processes. It is led by Dr. John Berten (who will head the junior research group) and Prof. Dr. Alexandra Kaasch (chair of the working group of "German and Transnational Social Policy") at Bielefeld University, Germany.

The three positions are part-time (75%), fixed-term (until 31 March 2027), with a salary according to the German pay scale TV-L E13. Deadline for applications is 7 March 2024. Starting date: as soon as possible (between 1 April and 1 June 2024).

Your Tasks

We expect

Preferred experience and skills

We offer

Application Procedure

We are looking forward to receiving your application. To apply, please preferably use our online form via the application button on the official website.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us via email - john.berten@uni-bielefeld.de and alexandra.kaasch@uni-bielefeld.de.

Application Deadline: 07 March 2024

Association for Social Economics, US

Job title: Association Director

The Association for Social Economics seeks a new Association Director who will be responsible for most of the day-to-day operations of the Association. The position requires excellent administrative skills and (because of financial tasks) residency in the United States.

Duties and Responsibilities

The responsibilities of this position include:

1. Assists the President in scheduling Spring and December Executive Council meetings, prepares preliminary agendas, and compiles and circulates the agendas and reports.
2. Announces the annual membership meeting to the membership and prepares a preliminary agenda for the meeting.
3. Prepares minutes for the Spring and December Executive Council meetings and the annual membership meeting and circulates them for approval.
4. Prepares, posts, and reports the results of on-line membership ballots, including those related to the December election of Executive Council and any required for approval of changes to the Constitution or Bylaws.
5. Maintains the ASE Leadership Packet, updating it to reflect any approved changes.
6. Prepares, in January of each year, an updated listing of the members of the Executive Council and of the Association’s committees circulates these listings, along with an up-to- date ASE Leadership Packet, to all Council members and committee members.
7. Prepares (based on templates and documented practices from previous years) programs; brochures; award certificates, and documents for the membership meeting; and other materials for the ASSA meetings.
8. Responds to inquiries regarding membership and liaises with the publisher of the Association journals regarding member subscriptions.
9. Work with the website manager to maintain the webpage for the Association, keeping all information updated.
10. Maintains a listing of recipients of all award recipients and a listing of members who have been nominated to the Executive Council.
11. Is responsible for maintaining the financial accounts, including handling revenues and paying obligations related to the Association itself, to the functions of authorized Association committees, and to the Association’s two journals. Maintains records of all transactions and their purpose. Is a signatory on all accounts and assets of the Association.
12. Seeks, in advance and with the support of the Treasurer, sales-tax exemption in states hosting events funded by the ASE.
13. Is responsible for maintaining an archive of all significant ASE documents, including all agendas, minutes, attachments, and reports; all receipts necessary for tax purposes; all contracts, and past and updated versions of the Constitution, Bylaws, and Policies and Procedures documents.
14. Responds to inquiries from ASE members, officers, members of committees, and members of the public (e.g., concerning financial issues, the website, Association records, or ASE policies and procedures) either answering them directly or referring the inquirer to the appropriate individual, committee, or document.
15. Chairs the Membership and Outreach Committee, which is charged with facilitating communication among Association members and promoting the Association to prospective members. As Chair, the Association Director will call meetings and see that committee activities are coordinated.
16. Serves on the Finance Committee as a voting member.
17. Serves on the Nomination Committee as a voting member
18. Is a voting member of the Executive Council.
19. Manages, supervise, and support the Administrative Assistant, and the Social Media Coordinator.

Compensation
1. The ASE Treasurer, under the supervision of the ASE President, is empowered to negotiate with the employer of the Association Director for the Association to reimburse their institution for the prevailing cost of a course release, up to $8,000 per year. The Association Director has the option of accepting this amount as direct compensation in lieu of release time, paid in twice- per-year installments.
2. The Association Director receives one of the complementary hotel rooms allocated to the Association for attending the annual meetings of ASE in association with the ASSA. They receive reimbursement of the cost of necessary inter- and intra-city travel and conference registration if full funding is not provided by their host institution and receive a flat payment of $250 to cover meals and incidentals during the conference.

Application Procedure
Interested individuals should send a letter expressing interest, a CV, and the names of two references to the ASE President-Elect, and search committee chair, Belinda Roman, at broman@stmarytx.edu. Review of applications will begin March 15, 2024 and will continue until the position is filled. The Association for Social Economics is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate based on race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin, or disability.

Preliminary Application Deadline: 15 March 2024

Bielefeld University, Germany (2/3)

job title: PhD Position 2: the global spread of eco-social reform proposals

The project SoSiKri (Soziale Sicherung im Krisenmodus; "Social Security in a Crisis Mode") is looking to fill three PhD positions. The junior research group (which is funded by the Fördernetzwerk Interdisziplinäre Sozialpolitikforschung/Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, Germany) explores how scenarios of ecological crises influence social policy - its institutions and reform processes. It is led by Dr. John Berten (who will head the junior research group) and Prof. Dr. Alexandra Kaasch (chair of the working group of "German and Transnational Social Policy") at Bielefeld University, Germany.

The three positions are part-time (75%), fixed-term (until 31 March 2027), with a salary according to the German pay scale TV-L E13. Deadline for applications is 7 March 2024. Starting date: as soon as possible (between 1 April and 1 June 2024).

Your Tasks

Employment is conducive to scientific qualification.

We offer

We expect

Preferred experience and skills

Application Procedure

We are looking forward to receiving your application. To apply, please preferably use our online form via the application button on the official website.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us via email - john.berten@uni-bielefeld.de and alexandra.kaasch@uni-bielefeld.de.

Application Deadline: 07 March 2024

Bielefeld University, Germany (3/3)

job title: PhD Position 3: global discourses of ecological crises and crisis effects on social security systems

The project SoSiKri (Soziale Sicherung im Krisenmodus; "Social Security in a Crisis Mode") is looking to fill three PhD positions. The junior research group (which is funded by the Fördernetzwerk Interdisziplinäre Sozialpolitikforschung/Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, Germany) explores how scenarios of ecological crises influence social policy - its institutions and reform processes. It is led by Dr. John Berten (who will head the junior research group) and Prof. Dr. Alexandra Kaasch (chair of the working group of "German and Transnational Social Policy") at Bielefeld University, Germany.

The three positions are part-time (75%), fixed-term (until 31 March 2027), with a salary according to the German pay scale TV-L E13. Deadline for applications is 7 March 2024. Starting date: as soon as possible (between 1 April and 1 June 2024).

Your Tasks

Employment is conducive to scientific qualification.

We expect

Preferred experience and skills

We offer

Application Procedure

We are looking forward to receiving your application. To apply, please preferably use our online form via the application button on the official website.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us via email - john.berten@uni-bielefeld.de and alexandra.kaasch@uni-bielefeld.de.

Application Deadline: 07 March 2024

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Austria 

Job title: Researcher in Macroeconomic Agent-Based Modeling - International Institute for Applied System Analysis (IIASA)

We are looking to hire an outstanding researcher in the overlapping fields of Computational Economics and Data Science/Computer Science, as we are actively expanding our macroeconomic research unit. The successful candidate will contribute to the development of a data-intensive macroeconomic agent-based model (ABM). Specifically, they will leverage diverse and extensive micro-datasets for model calibration, focusing on the in-depth exploration of critical aspects related to income distribution and other significant macroeconomic dynamics. Following a one-year fixed-term employment contract, we intend to offer the successful candidate an open-ended contract with IIASA. Please find further information on the website.

Application Deadline: 22 February 2024

TU Munich, Germany

Job Title: 3 Professorships in Political Theory and Philosophy, Political Economy, Governance, Diversity and Algorithms

Scientific Environment

The professorships will be assigned to the Munich School of Politics and Public Policy and the TUM School of Social Sciences & Technology (SOT).

Anchored in a unique founding history aimed at strengthening democratic education and the rule of law in post-war Germany, the Munich School of Politics and Public Policy has been an independent institution at the Technical University of Munich since 2014. The strategic integration of and interplay between political science and the technical and natural sciences are at the core of this exceptional interdisciplinary research and teaching environment. Professorships in focus areas such as data and society, governance, political economy, and sustainability (incl. health) engage in diverse research, teaching, and outreach activities. They aim to explore current political issues, complex international interdependencies, and the opportunities and challenges of technological and science-driven innovations in society.

The TUM School of Social Sciences and Technology (SOT) brings together an international community of researchers and educators from the fields of governance, educational science, and science & technology studies. It enhances the role of social sciences through interdisciplinary research, teaching, and outreach as an integral part of TUM’s commitment to Human-Centered Engineering. It offers a unique intellectual environment committed to the public interest, social justice, and an inclusive culture of learning and exploration in an interdisciplinary setting to understand, evaluate, and shape some of the world’s biggest societal challenges and their interaction with technological transformations.

Responsibilities

The responsibilities include research and teaching, as well as the promotion of early-career scientists. We seek to appoint experts in the above-mentioned research areas who will introduce and develop innovative ways to accelerate the School’s mission of addressing some of the most pressing public interest challenges of our time and achieving social impact. This could be through cutting-edge interdisciplinary scholarship, innovative political and/or social science methods, or public policy engagement. Teaching responsibilities include courses in the School’s bachelor’s and master’s programs, offerings in programs at other TUM Schools, and engagement in doctoral and lifelong learning programs. We also expect the professorships to enhance the close collaboration between the Munich School of Politics and Public Policy and TUM and actively contribute to public engagement and outreach activities, for instance, in the context of the TUM Think Tank.

Qualifications

We are looking for candidates who have demonstrated excellent achievements in research and teaching in an internationally recognized scientific environment relative to the relevant career level (please see www.tum.de/en/faculty-recruiting-faq/ for further information). A university degree and an outstanding doctoral degree or equivalent scientific qualification, as well as pedagogical aptitude, are prerequisites. Substantial research experience abroad is expected. In particular, candidates must be committed to collaborative and interdisciplinary research and teaching at the intersection of politics, society, science, and technology issues. Additionally, candidates should possess strong methodological skills, preferably with a background in quantitative methods, and be willing to contribute to methods-teaching. We welcome applications from individuals who can contribute – and ideally combine – diverse perspectives, backgrounds, disciplines, and methodologies to enrich the research areas mentioned previously.

Our Offer

Based on the best international standards and transparent performance criteria, TUM offers a merit-based academic career path for tenure track faculty from Assistant Professor through a permanent position as Associate Professor, and on to Full Professor. The regulations of the TUM Faculty Recruitment and Career System apply.

TUM provides excellent working conditions in a lively scientific community embedded in the vibrant research environment of the Greater Munich Area. The TUM environment is multicultural, with English serving as a common interface for scientific interaction. TUM offers attractive and performance-based salary conditions and social benefits.

The TUM Munich Dual Career Office (MDCO) provides tailored career consulting to the partners of newly appointed professors. The MDCO assists in the relocation and integration of new professors, their partners, and accompanying family members.

Your Application

TUM is an equal-opportunity employer and explicitly encourages applications from women. The position is suitable for persons with disabilities. Applicants with disabilities will be given preference in case of generally equivalent suitability, aptitude and professional performance.

Application documents should be submitted in accordance with TUM’s application guidelines for professors. These guidelines and detailed information about the TUM Faculty Recruitment and Career System are available at www.tum.de/faculty-recruiting. Here, you will also find TUM’s information on collecting and processing personal data as part of the application process. Please submit your application via the recruitment portal: www.recruit.tum.de. For further information visit the website.

Application Deadline: 12 March 2024

University College Dublin, Ireland (1/2)

Job title: Senior European Research Council (ERC) Fellow

Democracy Challenged is a 5-year project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) to investigate the role of legal-technical power in shaping corporate tax avoidance and the wealth inequalities that undermine democracy. The project has five research objectives. First, to develop a new theoretical framework, typology, and causal mechanism for studying the relationship between corporate tax avoidance, wealth inequalities, and democratic capitalism. Second, to empirically map, reconstruct, and explain the global tax-avoiding wealth chains of big-tech and big-pharmaceutical multinationals. Third, to explain how legal-technical experts create and sustain these tax-avoiding strategies and structures. Fourth, to examine the role of the media in democratically contesting the technocratic politics of corporate taxation. Fifth, to develop new normative principles to guide democracy-enhancing reforms.

A post-PhD researcher is being recruited to work with the Principal Investigator to deliver the qualitative and socio-legal parts of the project, particularly those focused on corporate tax law, and understanding the role of legal-technical experts in creating the tax-avoiding wealth chains of multinational corporations in the big-tech and big-pharma sectors. This is a post-PhD academic research role, where you will conduct a specified programme of research to deliver specific work packages of the ERC grant, under the supervision and direction of the Principal Investigator.

This is a 4 year (48 months) position.

Required Qualifications

Desirable Qualifications

For more details on the position and application instructions please visit the posting site. Informal inquiries can also be directed to Professor Aidan Regan (aidan.regan@ucd.ie)

Deadline for submission: 28 March 2024

University College Dublin, Ireland (2/2)

Job title: European Research Council (ERC) PhD position

Democracy Challenged is a 5-year project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) to investigate the role of legal-technical power in shaping corporate tax avoidance and the wealth inequalities that undermine democracy. The project has five research objectives. First, to develop a new theoretical framework, typology, and causal mechanism for studying the relationship between corporate tax avoidance, wealth inequalities, and democratic capitalism. Second, to empirically map, reconstruct, and explain the global tax-avoiding wealth chains of big-tech and big-pharmaceutical multinationals. Third, to explain how legal-technical experts create and sustain these tax-avoiding strategies and structures. Fourth, to examine the role of the media in democratically contesting the technocratic politics of corporate taxation. Fifth, to develop new normative principles to guide democracy-enhancing reforms.

A PhD researcher is being recruited to work with the Principal Investigator to deliver the qualitative and socio-legal parts of the project, particularly those focused on corporate tax law, and understanding the role of legal-technical experts in creating the tax-avoiding wealth chains of multinational corporations in the big-tech and big-pharma sectors.

This is a 4 year (48 months) position.

Required Qualifications

Desirable Qualifications

Please submit application material directly to Professor Aidan Regan (aidan.regan@ucd.ie).

Deadline for submission: 28 March 2024

University of Barcelona, Spain (1/6)

job title: Postdoctoral Researcher in Ecological Macroeconomics

*Note: This is one of several ecological economics research positions available at the University of Barcelona. You can find the other openings on the Jobs page of this website.

The University of Barcelona is looking for an outstanding postdoctoral researcher in ecological economics to work on an exciting project entitled “Towards a Sustainable Well-being Economy: Integrated Policies and Transformative Indicators” (ToBe).

The postdoctoral researcher will help develop a novel ecological macroeconomic model that includes a wide range of indicators of human well-being and environmental sustainability (such as those in the “Doughnut” of social and planetary boundaries). The model will be used to assess different policy packages aimed at achieving a sustainable well-being economy.

The successful candidate will join a cutting-edge research team working on ecological economics and political ecology, with a particular focus on “post-growth” approaches. The motivation for this research is the observation that GDP growth is no longer improving people’s lives in wealthy nations, and yet it is contributing to a worsening ecological crisis. A new economic paradigm is needed.

Candidate Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have a PhD in an area such as ecological economics, environmental studies, natural/social sciences, etc. Expertise in quantitative research methods and/or computer programming is essential. Knowledge of topics such as human well-being, planetary boundaries, provisioning systems, input–output analysis, system dynamics, machine learning, and/or material flow analysis is desirable. Experience with existing ecological macroeconomic models (e.g. PyMedeas, EuroGreen, or LowGrow SFC) would be advantageous. Note that we do not expect a single candidate to know all of these areas.

We strongly value motivation and initiative, along with skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, professional writing, and the ability to work as part of an international team.

Details on the Position

The position is available to start as soon as possible (ideally no later than 1st May 2024), and will last for approximately two years, depending on the exact start date. Completion of a PhD by the start date of the contract is a requirement for the position.

The position will be based in the Faculty of Economics, at the University of Barcelona (Spain), under the supervision of Dan O’Neill and Federico Demaria. The gross salary is 36,250 euros per year.

Application Instructions

To apply, please email your application to ecoeco.recruitment@gmail.com, with the subject line “Application for ToBe position”, no later than Sunday 25th February 2024, 23:59 CET. Please include a one-page motivation letter, your CV, and a one-page proposal on how you would integrate environmental and/or social indicators in a macroeconomic model. Interviews will be carried out with shortlisted candidates via Zoom, tentatively the first week of March. Two reference letters will be requested for candidates invited for an interview.

The successful candidate will join one of the top groups of post-growth researchers in the world. We work closely as a team, and the successful candidate is expected to live and work in the Barcelona area. Barcelona is a dynamic city on the Mediterranean, with a very high quality of life. The University of Barcelona is generally regarded as the top university in Spain, and one of the best in Europe.

For more information, please visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 25 February 2024, 23:59 CET

University of Barcelona, Spain (2/6)

job title: Postdoctoral Researcher in Input–Output and Time-Use Analysis

*Note: This is one of several ecological economics research positions available at the University of Barcelona. You can find the other openings on the Jobs page of this website.

The University of Barcelona looking for an outstanding postdoctoral researcher with expertise in input–output analysis to contribute to a new Horizon Europe research project entitled Models, Assessment, and Policies for Sustainability (MAPS). This is a 2-year position, starting June 2024, with the possibility of an extension for an additional two years.

Position Description

The position will conduct research to understand the resource use and time-use requirements of achieving a good life for all people within planetary boundaries. The methods employed will include input–output analysis (to estimate the resource use and paid labour requirements of meeting basic needs), and time-use analysis (to estimate the amount of unpaid labour and leisure time associated with meeting these needs).

The position will be based in the Faculty of Economics, at the University of Barcelona (Spain), under the supervision of Dr Daniel O’Neill and Dr Federico Demaria.

Qualifications

Essential — The successful candidate will have:

Desirable — The successful candidate may have:

How to Apply

Please submit your CV and a motivation letter (max 2 pages) to Dr Daniel O’Neill and Dr Federico Demaria at ecoeco.recruitment@gmail.com by 10 March, 23:59 CET. The subject of your email should be: “Application for Postdoc Position in Input–Output and Time-Use Analysis”.

Within your motivation letter, please indicate how your skills and experience match the essential/desirable specifications listed above, and discuss how you would go about quantifying the resource use and labour/time-use requirements of a good life.

Please ask two referees to submit reference letters for you to ecoeco.reference@gmail.com by 10 March 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of their emails should be: “Reference for YOUR NAME”.

Deadline to apply: Sunday, 10 March, 23:59 CET

Start date of position: June 2024

Salary: €36,250 per year

Online interviews are expected to be held 21–22 March 2024.

The MAPS Project

There is an urgent need for a new economic paradigm that reconciles human well-being with environmental sustainability — one based on a “post-growth” approach. High-income countries must move beyond the pursuit of GDP growth as a policy goal, and instead pursue policies that improve human well-being while reducing resource use.

The aim of the MAPS project is to broaden the range of policies, models, and assessments to help achieve sustainability, equity, and human well-being. It is a 4-year Horizon Europe research project coordinated by the University of Barcelona, with nine other partners across Europe.

The successful candidate will join one of the top groups of post-growth researchers in the world. We work closely as a team, and the successful candidate is expected to live and work in the Barcelona area. Barcelona is a dynamic city on the Mediterranean, with a very high quality of life. The University of Barcelona is generally regarded as the top university in Spain, and one of the best in Europe. We are committed to advancing the careers of junior women researchers, and researchers from under-represented backgrounds, who are encouraged to apply.

For more information please visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 10 March 2024

University of Barcelona, Spain (3/6)

job title: Senior Researcher in Ecological Macroeconomics – University of Barcelona

*Note: This is one of several ecological economics research positions available at the University of Barcelona. You can find the other openings on the Jobs page of this website.

The University of Barcelona is looking for a senior postdoctoral researcher with excellent organisational skills to help lead a transformative new Horizon Europe research project entitled Models, Assessment, and Policies for Sustainability (MAPS). This is a 4-year position, starting June 2024.

The Project

There is an urgent need for a new economic paradigm that reconciles human well-being with environmental sustainability – one based on a “post-growth” approach. High-income countries must move beyond the pursuit of GDP growth as a policy goal, and instead pursue policies that improve human well-being while reducing resource use.

The aim of the MAPS project is to broaden the range of policies, models, and assessments to help achieve sustainability, equity, and human well-being. It is a 4-year Horizon Europe research project coordinated by the University of Barcelona, with nine other partners across Europe, and a total budget of €5 million.

Position Description

We are looking for an outstanding postdoctoral researcher in ecological economics, with excellent organisational and time management skills, to help manage and coordinate the MAPS project. In particular, the candidate will help lead the development of a novel ecological macroeconomic model across teams at different institutions. The successful candidate will work closely with the Project Coordinators (Daniel O’Neill and Federico Demaria) and the Administrative Project Manager (Nathalie Roy).

The successful candidate is expected to work a 4-day week on the MAPS project, with the fifth day reserved for their own research interests. In a typical 4-day week, we envisage that the candidate would spend roughly two days on project-related research and two days on coordination of research. This position is an incredible opportunity for a senior postdoc who wants to gain experience in how to obtain, manage, and report on a major funded research project.

The position will be based in the Faculty of Economics, at the University of Barcelona (Spain), under the supervision of Dr Daniel O’Neill and Dr Federico Demaria.

Responsibilities

The responsibilities of this position include:

Qualifications

Essential — The successful candidate will have:

Desirable — The successful candidate may have:

How to Apply

Please submit your CV and a motivation letter (max 2 pages) to Dr Daniel O’Neill and Dr Federico Demaria at ecoeco.recruitment@gmail.com by 10 March 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of your email should be: “Application for Senior Researcher in Ecological Macroeconomics”.

Within your motivation letter, please indicate how your skills and experience match the essential/desirable specifications listed above, and discuss how you would develop a novel ecological macroeconomic model designed to explore post-growth policy packages, with a team of modellers spanning 4–5 institutions.

Please ask three referees to submit reference letters for you to ecoeco.reference@gmail.com by 10 March 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of their emails should be: “Reference for YOUR NAME”.

Deadline to apply: Sunday, 10 March 2024, 23:59 CET

Start date of position: June 2024

Salary: €40,000 per year (with a 4-day workweek)

Online interviews are expected to be held 18–20 March 2024.

The successful candidate will join one of the top groups of post-growth researchers in the world. We work closely as a team, and the successful candidate is expected to live and work in the Barcelona area. Barcelona is a dynamic city on the Mediterranean, with a very high quality of life. The University of Barcelona is generally regarded as the top university in Spain, and one of the best in Europe.

We are committed to advancing the careers of women researchers, and researchers from under-represented backgrounds, who are encouraged to apply.

For more information please visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 10 March 2024

University of Barcelona, Spain (4/6)

job title: PhD on the Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Sustainability and Human Well-being

*Note: This is one of several ecological economics research positions available at the University of Barcelona. You can find the other openings on the Jobs page of this website.

The University of Barcelona is looking for an outstanding PhD candidate to work on an exciting new project on the impact that trends in artificial intelligence (AI) could have on environmental sustainability and human well-being. This funded PhD position will contribute to a new Horizon Europe research project entitled Models, Assessment, and Policies for Sustainability (MAPS). Funding is available for 3–4 years, with an anticipated start of September 2024.

The development of AI is already beginning to have an impact on society, and this impact is likely to increase exponentially in the coming years. AI is likely to have profound effects on employment, environmental resource use, and ultimately human well-being. To date, these effects, and how to manage them, remain vastly under-researched.

Position Description

This position will estimate the impact of different scenarios of digitalisation, automation, and artificial intelligence on the labour and resource use requirements of economic activity, and estimate the potential impact of these trends on human well-being. It will explore questions such as: (1) What impacts would different AI scenarios have on resource use and environmental sustainability? (2) What impacts would different AI scenarios have on employment, time use, and human well-being? (3) What policies would help steer AI development towards the achievement of a good life for all within planetary boundaries? (4) Can AI be aligned with the goals of a “post-growth” economy?

The methods used will include techniques such as environmentally-extended input–output analysis, time-use analysis, machine learning, and scenario modelling.

The position will be based at the University of Barcelona (Spain), under the primary supervision of Dr Daniel O’Neill.

Qualifications

Essential — The successful candidate will have:

Desirable — The successful candidate may have:

How to Apply

Please submit your CV, transcripts from previous degrees, and a motivation letter (max 2 pages) to Dr Daniel O’Neill at ecoeco.recruitment@gmail.com by 20 March 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of your email should be: “Application to PhD on Impact of Artificial Intelligence”.

Within your motivation letter, please indicate how your skills and experience match the essential/desirable specifications listed above, and discuss how you would assess the impact that trends in artificial intelligence could have on environmental sustainability and human well-being.

Within the body of your email, please specify for both your undergraduate and master’s degrees: (1) the title of the degree, (2) the institution and country, (3) the years in which your started and competed the degree, and (4) the average grade for your degree. Please include this grade (a) on the original grading scale, and (b) on either the Spanish, UK, or US GPA grading scale. If your master’s degree is not yet complete, please indicate the expected completion date. If your degrees are from Europe, please also include the number of ECTS. Please provide this information for each degree separately.

Please ask two referees to submit reference letters for you to ecoeco.reference@gmail.com by 20 March 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of their emails should be: “Reference for YOUR NAME”.

Deadline to apply: Wednesday, 20 March, 2024, 23:59 CET

Start date of position: September 2024

Salary: €22,250 per year, plus payment of tuition fees

Online interviews are expected to be held 8–12 April.

The successful candidate will be invited to submit an application for admission to a PhD programme at the University of Barcelona. There is some flexibility on the choice of PhD programme based on the candidate’s previous background (e.g. economics, computer science, environmental science, sociology, etc.)

The MAPS Project

There is an urgent need for a new economic paradigm that reconciles human well-being with environmental sustainability — one based on a “post-growth” approach. High-income countries must move beyond the pursuit of GDP growth as a policy goal, and instead pursue policies that improve human well-being while reducing resource use.

The aim of the MAPS project is to broaden the range of policies, models, and assessments to help achieve sustainability, equity, and human well-being. It is a 4-year Horizon Europe research project coordinated by the University of Barcelona, with nine other partners across Europe.

The successful candidate will join one of the top groups of post-growth researchers in the world. We work closely as a team, and the successful candidate is expected to live and work in the Barcelona area. Barcelona is a dynamic city on the Mediterranean, with a very high quality of life. The University of Barcelona is generally regarded as the top university in Spain, and one of the best in Europe.

We are committed to advancing the careers of junior women researchers, and researchers from under-represented backgrounds, who are encouraged to apply.

For more information, please visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 20 March 2024

University of Barcelona, Spain (5/6)

job title: Postdoctoral Researcher in Machine Learning for Ecological Macroeconomic Models

*Note: This is one of several ecological economics research positions available at the University of Barcelona. You can find the other openings on the Jobs page of this website.

The University of Barcelona is looking for an outstanding postdoctoral researcher with expertise in artificial intelligence and machine learning methods to contribute to a new Horizon Europe research project entitled Models, Assessment, and Policies for Sustainability (MAPS). This is a 2-year position, with an expected start date of June–September 2024.

Position Description

This position will explore the ways in which machine learning methods could be applied to better model environmental and social outcomes within an ecological macroeconomic model. Ecological macroeconomic models are simulation tools that allow for the exploration of the dynamic feedbacks between technological development, economic activity, environmental impacts, and social outcomes. They allow for multiple non-substitutable goals to be explored (e.g. sustainability, equity, and human well-being). To date, there has been very little work exploring how machine learning techniques could be applied within an ecological macroeconomic model.

The successful candidate will join an international team of researchers developing a new model that includes a wide range of indicators of human well-being and environmental sustainability (such as those in the “Doughnut” of social and planetary boundaries). This model will be used to assess different policy packages aimed at achieving a sustainable economy, in particular “post-growth” approaches that move beyond GDP as a measure of progress. The motivation for this research is the observation that the pursuit of GDP growth is no longer improving people’s lives in wealthy nations, and yet it is contributing to a worsening ecological crisis. A new economic paradigm is needed.

In addition to applying machine learning methods in a modelling context, the position may also explore broader questions related to the impact of AI on society such as: (1) What impacts would different AI scenarios have on environmental sustainability and human well-being? (2) What policies would help steer AI development towards the achievement of a good life for all within planetary boundaries? (3) Can AI be aligned with the goals of a “post-growth” economy?

The position will be based in the Faculty of Economics, at the University of Barcelona (Spain), under the primary supervision of Dr Daniel O’Neill.

Qualifications

Essential — The successful candidate will have:

Desirable — The successful candidate may have:

How to Apply

Please submit your CV and a motivation letter (max 2 pages) to Dr Daniel O’Neill at ecoeco.recruitment@gmail.com by 20 March 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of your email should be: “Application for Postdoc in Modelling with Machine Learning”.

Within your motivation letter, please indicate how your skills and experience match the essential/desirable specifications listed above, and discuss how you would use machine learning to improve the modelling of environmental and social indicators.

Please ask two referees to submit reference letters for you to ecoeco.reference@gmail.com by 20 March 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of their emails should be: “Reference for YOUR NAME”.

Deadline to apply: Wednesday, 20 March 2024, 23:59 CET

Start date of position: June–September 2024

Salary: €36,250 per year

Online interviews are expected to be held 8–12 April.

The MAPS Project

There is an urgent need for a new economic paradigm that reconciles human well-being with environmental sustainability — one based on a “post-growth” approach. High-income countries must move beyond the pursuit of GDP growth as a policy goal, and instead pursue policies that improve human well-being while reducing resource use.

The aim of the MAPS project is to broaden the range of policies, models, and assessments to help achieve sustainability, equity, and human well-being. It is a 4-year Horizon Europe research project coordinated by the University of Barcelona, with nine other partners across Europe.

The successful candidate will join one of the top groups of post-growth researchers in the world. We work closely as a team, and the successful candidate is expected to live and work in the Barcelona area. Barcelona is a dynamic city on the Mediterranean, with a very high quality of life. The University of Barcelona is generally regarded as the top university in Spain, and one of the best in Europe.

We are committed to advancing the careers of junior women researchers, and researchers from under-represented backgrounds, who are encouraged to apply.

For more information, please visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 20 March 2024

University of Barcelona, Spain (6/6)

job title: Postdoctoral Researcher in Post-Growth Policymaking

*Note: This is one of several ecological economics research positions available at the University of Barcelona. You can find the other openings on the Jobs page of this website.

The University of Barcelona is looking for an outstanding postdoctoral researcher in ecological economics or a related field to work on an exciting European research project entitled “Measuring what matters: Improving usability and accessibility of policy frameworks and indicators for multidimensional well-being through collaboration” (MERGE). This is a 2-year position with an expected start date of September/October 2024.

The motivation for this research is the observation that GDP growth is no longer improving people’s lives in wealthy nations, and yet it is contributing to a worsening ecological crisis. A new economic paradigm is needed.

Position Description

In collaboration with a team of modellers, this position will contribute to the development of a novel ecological macroeconomic model designed to explore post-growth policy packages. The model will go beyond GDP, to include a wide range of indicators of human well-being and environmental sustainability (such as those in the “Doughnut” of social and planetary boundaries).

The candidate will engage with European policymakers (i.e. with a co-creative workshop) to identify their modelling needs and barriers to the uptake of post-growth models. We are particularly interested in understanding what makes policymakers use the particular models they do. For instance, is it a case of institutional lock-in, technical issues, political issues, or perceived legitimacy of different modelling approaches?

The researcher will then apply methods such as semi-structured interviews and multi-criteria analysis to evaluate the potential of different post-growth modelling approaches to meet the needs of policymakers and model indicators and policies that are relevant for a post-growth economy.

This information will feed into the development of an ecological macroeconomic model, which will be used to assess different policy packages aimed at achieving a sustainable economy. Building on this work, the candidate will produce a high-profile policy brief showcasing how modelling indicators that go beyond GDP can lead to very different policy priorities.

In addition, the successful candidate may also contribute to research mapping policy proposals from different visions, with a focus on alternatives to growth-oriented proposals such as degrowth. They will investigate the barriers that might hinder the adoption of post-growth policies, and explore pathways to increase the feasibility of post-growth policies.

The position will be based in the Faculty of Economics, at the University of Barcelona (Spain), under the supervision of Dr Federico Demaria and Dr Daniel O’Neill.

Qualifications

Essential — The successful candidate will have:

Desirable — The successful candidate may have:

How to Apply

Please submit your CV and a motivation letter (max 2 pages) to Dr Federico Demaria and Dr Daniel O’Neill at ecoeco.recruitment@gmail.com by 7 April 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of your email should be: “Application for Postdoc in Post-Growth Policymaking”.

Within your motivation letter, please indicate how your skills and experience match the essential/desirable specifications listed above, and discuss how you would explore (i) the modelling needs of European policymakers, (ii) barriers to the uptake of post-growth models/policies, and (iii) ways that these barriers could be overcome.

Please ask two referees to submit reference letters for you to ecoeco.reference@gmail.com by 7 April 2024, 23:59 CET. The subject of their emails should be: “Reference for YOUR NAME”.

Deadline to apply: Sunday, 7 April 2024, 23:59 CET

Start date of position: September/October 2024

Salary: €36,250 per year

Online interviews are expected to be held 23–26 April 2024.

The successful candidate will join one of the top groups of post-growth researchers in the world. We work closely as a team, and the successful candidate is expected to live and work in the Barcelona area. Barcelona is a dynamic city on the Mediterranean, with a very high quality of life. The University of Barcelona is generally regarded as the top university in Spain, and one of the best in Europe.

We are committed to advancing the careers of junior women researchers, and researchers from under-represented backgrounds, who are encouraged to apply.

For more information, please visit the official website.

Application Deadline: 07 April 2024

University of Oslo, Norway

job title: Doctoral Research Fellowship in History

A Doctoral Research Fellowship (SKO 1017) in History is available at the Department of Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History (IAKH), University of Oslo. The position is associated with the Research Group “History of Capitalism”, and in particular the Norwegian Research Council (NRC) funded project "Persistence or change? Lessons from the introduction of enhetsskolen in Denmark and Norway".

The project contributes to the global debate about how to overcome today’s societal challenges in terms of educational inequalities and restricted educational systems by turning to history to study the long-term effects of Denmark and Norway’s inclusive school system: enhetsskolen (unity school). We follow the creation of the systems from the late 19th century over a period of 150 years and evaluate the early reforms. A Scandinavian Educational Database (1800-1950) is being developed based on student grades and graduate biographies. This Database is being linked to the Norwegian Historical Population Register and Link Lives of Denmark. Using individual level data on the complete life spans of the entire populations we examine variation in the timing of educational reforms, and regional and national variations in their implementation.

Prospective applicants need to submit a proposal that is closely aligned with the overarching NRC project. However, the proposal must stand as an independent and separate historical project in its own right. Historical topics of particular interest are (not exclusively) the building of education systems, education and travelling or migration, education and industrial development and education and knowledge transfer. While the primary geographic scope of the NRC project is Scandinavia, the project also welcomes and encourages a focus on additional geographical areas.

Qualification requirements

To be eligible for admission to the doctoral programmes at the University of Oslo, applicants must, as a minimum, have completed a five-year graduation course (Master’s degree or equivalent), including a Master’s thesis of at least 30 ECTS. In special cases, the Faculty may grant admission on the basis of a one-year Master course following an assessment of the study programme’s scope and quality.

In assessing the applications, special emphasis will be placed on:

Applicants who have recently graduated with excellent results may be given preference.

We offer

How to apply

The application must include

Please note that all documents must be in English or a Scandinavian language. Educational certificates, master theses and the like are not to be submitted with the application, but applicants may be asked to submit such information or works later. The application with attachments must be delivered in our electronic recruiting system, jobbnorge.no. Short-listed candidates will be invited for an interview.

For more information about the position, see here.

Application Deadline: 29 February 2024

University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, Puerto Rico

Job title: Assistant Professor of Economics

A tenure track position has opened in the Economics department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez. The candidate would need to speak Spanish. It is a very heterodox friendly department with a pluralist faculty from different schools of thought, including Marxian, Radical Political Economics, Institutionalist Economics, Ecological Economics, among others.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must (1) have earned a doctoral (Ph.D.) degree in economics or related field from an accredited institution; (2) demonstrate excellence or potential for excellence for teaching and research in one of the Department's areas of interest, i.e., microeconomics, macroeconomics, behavioral economics, diversity economics, health economics, experimental economics, quantitative methods, economic education, energy economics, telecommunications economics, or emerging areas; (3) show potential and availability for teaching and research in core and service courses, such as econometrics, economic theory, research method, among others; (4) ability to work in a multidisciplinary environment; (5) demonstrate excellent oral and written communication skills in Spanish and English; (6) preferably show proficiency in the Spanish language or willingness to learn it.

JOB DESCRIPTION AND DUTIES

The selected candidate will (1) teach courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels; (2) contribute to the improvement of the departmental academic offer through the creation or revision of courses or curricular sequences in the different educational modalities: face-to-face, distance and hybrid; (3) develop and coordinate research projects in the area of specialization, as well as undergraduate and undergraduate mentoring activities; (4) periodically publish research papers in assemblies, congresses and/or peer-reviewed or professional journals (5) seek and attract external funding for the improvement of research; (6) participate in departmental, faculty, and institutional committees, assessment and continuous improvement activities, community outreach and outreach activities, and other department and institution support services.

HOW TO APPLY

Interested applicants must send their documentation via email to econ@uprm.edu. 1. Letter of intent that includes research and teaching plans. 2. Up-to-date Curriculum Vitae. 3. Official academic transcript of each of the university degrees (undergraduate, graduate and doctoral). 4. Copy of a recent publication or chapter of doctoral dissertation. 5. Three (3) professional recommendation letters.

For further information please visit the website or write Ricardo R. Fuentes-Ramírez

Journals

PSL Quarterly Review 76 (307)

Thomas Palley: The theory of monetary disorder: debt finance, existing assets, and the consequences of prolonged ultra-easy policy

Felipe Orsolin-Teixeira, Daniel Arruda Coronel, José Luis Oreiro: Income distribution and development: Celso Furtado’s theory in a context of global economic changes and its proximity to neo(post)-Kaleckian literature

Stefano Lucarelli: From the effective demand as a principle to the ownership of the capital as social responsibility. Rereading Luigi Pasinett

Prof. Dr. Edoardo Beretta, Marco Desogus, Prof. Dr. Soorjith Illickal Karthikeyan: The effect of reducing wages of remote workers on society. A preliminary assessment

Esteban Pérez Caldentey, Juan Carlos Moreno-Brid: Tony Thirlwall (21 April 1941 – 8 November 2023)

Advances in Economic Education 2 (2)

Daniela Tavasci and Eileen Tipoe: Introduction to the Symposium: CORE Econ – A viable alternative curriculum?

Carlos Cortinhas: Rethinking the economics curriculum: strengths and weaknesses of the CORE Econ project

Samuel Bowles and Wendy Carlin: The COherence and RElevance of CORE Econ’s new benchmark model

Jo Michell: CORE Econ: a Neoclassical Synthesis for the twenty-first century?

Paul Crosby and David Orsmond: Choosing an economics principles textbook: a perspective on the CORE project

Temesgen Kifle and Parvinder Kler: Does a rose by any other name smell as sweet? Assessing student evaluation of teaching ratings pre- and during the COVID-19 lockdown: an Australian study

Cambridge Journal of Economics 48 (1)

Brendan Burchell , Simon Deakin, Jill Rubery, David A Spencer: The future of work and working time: introduction to special issue

David A Spencer: Marx, Keynes and the future of working time

Francisca Mullens, Ignace Glorieux: Reducing working hours: shorter days or fewer days per week? Insights from a 30-hour workweek experiment

Debra Howcroft, Phil Taylor: Experiences of working time intensification and extensification: examining the influence of logics of production in IT work

François-Xavier Devetter, Julie Valentin: Long day for few hours: impact of working time fragmentation on low wages in France

Agnieszka Piasna: Algorithms of time: how algorithmic management changes the temporalities of work and prospects for working time reduction

Valeria Pulignano, Stefania Marino, Mathew Johnson, Markieta Domecka, Me-Linh Riemann: ‘Digital Tournaments’: the colonisation of freelancers’ ‘free’ time and unpaid labour in the online platform economy

Mariana Fernández Massi, Julieta Longo: Technology and remuneration of working time: a study on paid and unpaid working time in platform work

Ecological Economics 218

Adewale G. Awoyemi, Nazaret Ibáñez-Rueda, Jorge Guardiola, Juan Diego Ibáñez-Álamo: Human-nature interactions in the Afrotropics: Experiential and cognitive connections among urban residents in southern Nigeria

Paweł Niszczota, Jakub Błaszczyński: Hard to digest investments: People oppose investment in both conventional and cultured meat producers

Lisa Murken, Kati Kraehnert, Christoph Gornott: Is this land for sale? The effects of drought on land ownership in Uganda

Chiara Colesanti Senni, Skand Goel, Adrian von Jagow: Economic and financial consequences of water risks: The case of hydropower

Marianne Aasen, John Thøgersen, Arild Vatn, Paul C. Stern: The role of norm dynamics for climate relevant behavior: A 2019–2021 panel study of red meat consumption

Joachim Schleich, Elisabeth Dütschke, Elke Kanberger, Andreas Ziegler: On the relationship between individual carbon literacy and carbon footprint components

Thales A.P. West: Formal designation of Brazilian indigenous lands linked to small but consistent reductions in deforestation

Ya-Fang Sun, Bin Su, Sheng Zhong, Junyi He, Shiwei Yu: Determinants of Aggregated Embodied Carbon Intensity in Global Bilateral Exports by Firm Heterogeneity

Mauricio Hernández, Felipe Chávez-Bustamante: Sufficiency between producers and consumers: A configurational analysis

Hanna Helander, Simone Schnepf, Theresa Stetter, Francesca Ferrara, Sina Leipold: Convenient solutions, inconvenient truths – Why supermarkets will not drive food system transformation

Soumyajit Bhar, Sharachchandra Lele, Jihoon Min, Narasimha D. Rao: Water, air pollution and carbon footprints of conspicuous/luxury consumption in India

John-Oliver Engler, Max-Friedemann Kretschmer, Julius Rathgens, Joe A. Ament, Thomas Huth, Henrik von Wehrden: 15 years of degrowth research: A systematic review

Florian Lichtin, E. Keith Smith, Kay W. Axhausen, Thomas Bernauer: How to design publicly acceptable road pricing? Experimental insights from Switzerland

Stefan Drews, Ivan Savin, Jeroen van den Bergh: A Global Survey of Scientific Consensus and Controversy on Instruments of Climate Policy

Cristina Bernini, Federica Galli: Economic and Environmental Efficiency, Subsidies and Spatio-Temporal Effects in Agriculture

Onil Banerjee, Martín Cicowiez, Renato Vargas, Edmundo Molina-Perez, Kenneth J. Bagstad, Žiga Malek: The economics of decarbonizing Costa Rica's agriculture, forestry and other land uses sectors

Helena Clayton, Kassel L. Hingee, Will Chancellor, David Lindenmayer, Albert van Dijk, Michael Vardon, Chris Boult: Private benefits of natural capital on farms across an endangered ecoregion

Renato Molina, Christopher Costello, Daniel Kaffine: Sharing and expanding the co-benefits of conservation

Jie Su, Alexandros Gasparatos: Assessing the heterogeneity of public acceptability for mangrove restoration through a choice experiment

Nathan J. Cook: Experimental evidence on minority participation and the design of community-based natural resource management programs

Hanlin Wei, Rachael Goodhue, Minghua Zhang: Pesticide Use and Cropland Consolidation in California Organic Agriculture

Sónia Carvalho Ribeiro, Britaldo Soares Filho, Tiago Cesalpino, Alessandra Araújo, Marina Teixeira, Jussara Cardoso, Danilo Figueiras, Felipe Nunes, Raoni Rajão: Bioeconomic markets based on the use of native species (NS) in Brazil

Lea Nicita, Francesco Bosello, Gabriele Standardi, Robert Mendelsohn: An integrated assessment of the impact of agrobiodiversity on the economy of the Euro-Mediterranean region

Stephanie Brockmann, David C. Finnoff, Doran M. Mason, Edward S. Rutherford, Hongyan Zhang: Consequences of ecological aggregation in general equilibrium analysis of perturbed ecosystems

Forum for Social Economics 53 (1)

Priya & S. P. Singh: Factors Influencing the Adoption of Sustainable Agricultural Practices: A Systematic Literature Review and Lesson Learned for India

Lan Thi Mai Nguyen & Thao Thi Phuong Nguyen: Market Reaction to the Announcements of Free Trade Agreements: Evidence from Vietnam

Muhammad Salman Khan & Sarah De Nardi: The Affectual-Social Ecology of Cultural Artefacts: Illegal Markets and Religious Vandalism in Swat Valley, Pakistan

Mangirdas Morkūnas & Gabrielė Sirgėdaitė: Motives Underlying the Consumption of Black Market Cigarettes among Young People

Daniel Silander: The European Commission on Sustainable Development. A New Normative Power in Its Making?

Fiona Ottaviani: Sustainable Well-Being Indicators and Public Policy: A Cluster Analysis

Raja Khalidi: De-Mystifying the Decolonization of Palestine

Historical Materialism 31 (4)

Nicolás Grinberg: Latin American Development in Historical Perspective: Capital Accumulation through Primary-Commodity Production and Ground-Rent Appropriation

Geert Reuten: On the Distribution of Wealth and Capital Ownership; An Empirical Application to OECD Countries around 2019

Max Grünberg: The Planning Daemon: Future Desire and Communal Production

Frank Engster: Sohn-Rethel’s Unity of the Critique of Society and the Critique of Epistemology, and his Theoretical Blind Spot: Measure

Gabriele Schimmenti: Marx’s Dissertation in Light of the Value-Form

Industrial and Corporate Change 33 (1)

Gino Cattani and others: Entrants heterogeneity, pre-entry knowledge, and the target industry context: a taxonomy and a framework

Sung Hoon Lee: The technological regime and barriers to entry

U David Park and others:An image of industry: exploring the effects of knowledge sources in the medical imaging industry

Pamela Adams and others:Employee spinouts along the value chain

Rahul Kapoor and Johann Peter Murmann: The organizational and technological origins of the U.S. shale gas revolution, 1947 to 2012

Marco Guerzoni and others:Pre-entry knowledge base complexity and post-entry growth: evidence from Italian firms

Jeffrey Savage and Arvids A Ziedonis: Testing the waters: founding team composition and search heuristics in academic entrepreneurial ventures

Diego Zunino and others: New entrants, incumbents, and the search for knowledge: the role of job title ambiguity in the US information and communication technology industry, 2004–2014

Benjamin King and others: Reconciling theories on why employees of small firms are more likely to become entrepreneurs

Shane Greenstein: Archetypes of product launch by insiders, outsiders, and visionaries

Dominika Kinga Randle and Gary Paul Pisano: Diversification as an adaptive learning process: an empirical study of general-purpose and market-specific technological know-how in new market entry

Gwendolyn K Lee and Marvin B Lieberman: Exploration, exploitation, and mode of market entry: acquisition versus internal development by Amazon and Alphabet

Gianluca Capone: Outside In: challenges for evolutionary studies on entry

Alex Coad and others: Empirical issues concerning studies of firm entry

International Review of Applied Economics 37 (6)

Firoz Khan & Seeraj Mohamed: Elites and economic policy in South Africa’s transition and beyond

Parimal Ghosh & Maniklal Adhikary: Dynamicity and nonlinearity in the association between different facets of financial development and macroeconomic volatility: evidence from the World Economy

Petros Kosmas & Elias Ioakimoglou: Determinants of profitability in the economy of the Republic of Cyprus based on a classical Marxist approach

Subroto Rapih & Budi Wahyono: The relative impact of traditional and digital financial inclusion on economic growth: a threshold regression-based comparative analysis

Journal of Economic Methodology 31 (1)

Alexandre Müller Fonseca: Ontological wars in economics: the return of supervenience

Måns Abrahamson: Permissible preference purification: on context-dependent choices and decisive welfare judgements in behavioural welfare economics

Armin W. Schulz: Equilibrium modeling in economics: a design-based defense

Review of International Political Economy 31 (1)

Lama Tawakkol: Capitalizing on crises: the EBRD, Jordanian state and joint infrastructure fixes

José Manuel Leal & Matthew Paterson: Transnational city networks, global political economy, and climate governance: C40 in Mexico and Lima

Dóra Piroska & Bálint Schlett: Mandate management: a field theory approach to the EBRD’s adaptive practice in Egypt

Stine Quorning: The ‘climate shift’ in central banks: how field arbitrageurs paved the way for climate stress testing

Huei-Jyun Ye: Delayed cooperation: political systems, elections, and the outcomes of trade negotiations

Leon Wansleben: Growth models and central banking: dominant coalitions, organizational sense-making, and conservative policy innovations at the Bundesbank and Fed

Martín Arboleda, Thomas F. Purcell & Pablo Roblero: Fossil food: landed property as a hidden abode of global warming

Jeffrey Ding: The diffusion deficit in scientific and technological power: re-assessing China’s rise

Tidings P. Ndhlovu: Food (in)security, the moral economy, and Ubuntu in South Africa: a Southern perspective

Fabian Pape & Johannes Petry: East Asia and the politics of global finance: a developmental challenge to the neoliberal consensus?

Ian Tsung-yen Chen: Trading for survival: trade policy as a credible signal, alliance strategy, and public preferences in Taiwan

Leonardo Di Bonaventura Altuve: The demise of sovereign wealth funds

Lena Lee Andresen & Jan-Egbert Sturm: Do geopolitical interests affect how financial markets react to IMF programs?

Scott Lavery: Rebuilding the fortress? Europe in a changing world economy

Jack Taggart & Kavi Joseph Abraham: Norm dynamics in a post-hegemonic world: multistakeholder global governance and the end of liberal international order

Mark Anner: The contested terrain of global production: collective versus private labor governance on Guatemalan banana plantations

Review of Keynesian Economics 12 (1)

Joseph E. Stiglitz: Neoliberalism, Keynesian economics, and responding to today’s inflation

Ricardo Summa: Alternative uses of functional finance: Lerner, MMT, and the Sraffian supermultiplier

Ramiro E. Álvarez and Gabriel Brondino: The limits to redistribution in small open economies: the case of Argentina

Carlos Bianchi, Fernando Isabella, and Santiago Picasso: Rethinking the balance-of-payments-constrained approach, in the light of the recent commodity boom

Luiz Fernando de Paula, Júlia Leal, and Mateus Ferreira: Financial subordination of peripheral emerging economies: a Keynesian–Structuralist approach

Aleksandr V. Gevorkyan and Tarron Khemraj: Dominant currency shocks and foreign exchange pressure in the periphery

Review of Social Economy 82 (1)

Michael Delucchi, Richard B. Dadzie, Erik Dean & Xuan Pham: What’s that smell? Bullshit jobs in higher education

Frank Crowley & Edel Walsh: Tolerance, social capital, and life satisfaction: a multilevel model from transition countries in the European Union

Jennifer C. Olmsted: Care labor, intergenerational equity, and (social) sustainability

Carolina Dalla Chiesa & Erwin Dekker: Communicating identity: how the symbolic meaning of goods creates different market types

Klaus Kraemer, Luka Jakelja, Florian Brugger & Sebastian Nessel: The social ambiguity of money: empirical evidence on the multiple usability of money in social life

Alan Shipman & Ann Vogel: Streaming the festival: what is lost when cultural events go online

Michael Bennett & Rutger Claassen: The corporate social assessment: making public purpose pay

Anselm Schneider: Aligning corporate behaviour with the public good: a commentary on Bennett and Claassen

Books and Book Series

Busting the Bankers' Club

by Gerald Epstein | 2024, University of California Press

Bankers brought the global economic system to its knees in 2007 and nearly did the same in 2020. Both times, the US government bailed out the banks and left them in control. How can we end this cycle of trillion-dollar bailouts and make finance work for the rest of us? Busting the Bankers' Club confronts the powerful people and institutions that benefit from our broken financial system—and the struggle to create an alternative.

Drawing from decades of research on the history, economics, and politics of banking, economist Gerald Epstein shows that any meaningful reform will require breaking up this club of politicians, economists, lawyers, and CEOs who sustain the status quo. Thankfully, there are thousands of activists, experts, and public officials who are working to do just that. Clear-eyed and hopeful, Busting the Bankers' Club centers the individuals and groups fighting for a financial system that will better serve the needs of the marginalized and support important transitions to a greener, fairer economy.

Please find a link to the book here.

Dollar Hegemony: Past, Present, and Future

Edited by Thomas Palley, Esteban Pérez Caldentey and Matías Vernengo | Edward Elgar, 2024

Dollar hegemony is a defining structural feature of the modern international financial order, and it confers significant economic and political privileges on the US. This book explores the political economic foundations of and prospects for dollar hegemony.

The dollar’s hegemony rests on the economic, military, and international political power of the US. There have been two eras of dollar hegemony which were characterized by different models. Dollar hegemony 1.0 corresponded to the Bretton Woods era (1946-1971). Dollar hegemony 2.0 corresponds to the Neoliberal era (1980-Today). The deep foundation of both models is US power, but the two models have different economic operating systems. The articles in this book explore this and consider two further questions: what is the future of dollar hegemony? And: is there a better way of organizing the world monetary order? There has been considerable speculation of a drift to currency multipolarity but, so far, there is little evidence of that. The Chinese renminbi might join or displace the dollar as the world’s hegemonic currency, but that will require China making significant changes to its financial markets and monetary policy. Dollar hegemony imposes significant costs on developing and emerging market economies, but the international political economy of systemic reform is fraught, making reform unlikely.

Economists, researchers, policymakers, and students will find this volume an enlightening look at an important subject.

Please find a link to the book here.

Microeconomic Principles and Problems A Pluralist Introduction

By Geoffrey Schneider | Routledge, 2024

Microeconomic Principles and Problems offers a comprehensive introduction to all major perspectives in modern microeconomics, including mainstream and heterodox approaches. By providing multiple views of markets and how they work, readers will be better able to understand and analyze the complex behaviors of consumers, firms, and government officials, as well as the likely impact of a variety of economic events and policies.

Most principles textbooks cover only mainstream economics and neglect the rich contextual analysis of heterodox economists. Heterodox material is presented as complementary to mainstream economics: understanding both approaches yields the deepest level of understanding. The book covers standard models, and includes substantial coverage of existing economic realities, featuring case studies and descriptive data. The book includes some coverage of all major heterodox schools of thought. This second edition incorporates new and expanded material on international trade (including disintegration and Brexit), climate issues and perspectives including degrowth, inter-temporal exchanges and games, non-market exchanges, trends in job opportunities, the rising cost of education, the gig economy, social media as an industry, and updated examples and cases. The book’s suite of digital resources has also been revised to ensure examples and activities are relevant to each part of the book.

Written in an engaging style focused on real-world examples, this groundbreaking book brings economics to life. It offers the most contemporary and complete package for any pluralist microeconomics class.

Please, find a link to the book here.

The Concept of Property in Kant, Fichte, and Hegel: Freedom, Right, and Recognition

By Jacob Blumenfeld | Routledge, 2023

This book provides a detailed account of the role of property in German Idealism. It puts the concept of property in the center of the philosophical systems of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel and shows how property remains tied to their conceptions of freedom, right, and recognition.

The book begins with a critical genealogy of the concept of property in modern legal philosophy, followed by a reconstruction of the theory of property in Kant’s Doctrine of Right, Fichte’s Foundations of Natural Right, and Hegel’s JenaRealphilosophie. By turning to the tradition of German Rechtsphilosophie as opposed to the more standard libertarian and utilitarian frameworks of property, it explores the metaphysical, normative, political, and material questions that make property intelligible as a social relation. The book formulates a normative theory of property rooted in practical reason, mutual recognition, and social freedom. This relational theory of property, inspired by German Idealism, brings a fresh angle to contemporary property theory. Additionally, it provides crucial philosophical background to 19th-century debates on private property, inequality, labor, socialism, capitalism, and the state.

Please find a link to the book here.

The Debt Crisis of the 1980s Law and Political Economy

By Jérôme Sgard | Edward Elgar, 2023

This book offers a novel account of the significant debt crisis which hit many developing countries during the 1980s. It starts with the flawed cycle of bank lending during the 1970s, and then moves from the opening act, in Mexico in 1982, until a solution was found with the 1989 Brady Initiative.

The Debt Crisis of the 1980s also articulates closely the economic and financial dimensions alongside the political and multilateral ones. The key relation between debtor countries and the IMF is explored in detail, but the book also documents the tense and often coercive interactions with commercial banks as well as on the continuing resistance to the IMF-led strategy among G7 governments. How debt contracts were restructured during all those years helps understanding how the Brady Initiative worked in practice, and how it prepared the ground for the turn to global markets after 1990. This debt crisis was indeed one of the main incubators of globalisation. This underlines further its unique character in the long-run history of sovereign debts, before and after the 1980s.

Remarkably, this book rests on in-depth interviews with the key players. Transcripts are included for the six most important players, including the former heads of the US Federal Reserve and the IMF. Archives from the IMF, the New York Federal Reserve, the Bank of England and commercial banks have also been systematically exploited, often for the first time ever.

This narrative and analytical account of one of the biggest debt crises in history is addressed to students and researchers in economics, international history, political economy and socio-legal studies. It will additionally be of value for professional economists and lawyers working on sovereign debts.

Please find a link to the book here.

Toward a Theory of Uneven and Combined Late Capitalist Development

By Kamran Nayeri | BookBaby, 2024

In this book, I critically survey a representative set of theories of late capitalist development to outline a theory of uneven and combined development. The selected theorists and their focus are W. Arthur Lewis (growth with an unlimited supply of labor), Raul Prebisch and Arghiri Emmanuel (terms of trade and unequal exchange), Paul Baran (monopoly capital thesis), Stephen Hymer (internationalization of capital and uneven development), Nicholas Kaldor (cumulative causation model), Alexander Gerschenkron (relative backwardness thesis), and Ernest Mandel (search for surplus-profit and uneven and combined development). They provide a spectrum of theoretical approaches to late capitalist development, including economic development, international trade, industrial organization, post-Keynesian theory, economic history, and Marxian theory.

I focus on competition to analyze these theories and develop an outline of a theory of uneven and combined late capitalist development. In most economic theories, competition serves as the organizing principle and the medium of realization of the development process. Yet, the role of competition in theories of late capitalist development still needs to be examined. The book analyzes in detail the problem of competition, including in the labor market (Lewis, Prebisch, Emmanuel), commodity markets (Baran, Kaldor, Mandel), technology (Kaldor), management and firm organization (Hymer), finance (Gerschenkron), and the state (Baran, Hymer, Gerschenkron, Mandel). I explore the logic of these theories, how competition is conceived, and its role in understanding the late development process. The basic conclusion is that dynamic, evolutionary conceptions of competition, which are sensitive to the institutional context, limited internal capitalist development, and the capitalist world market, play an essential role in understanding late development. Static views of competition, to the contrary, undermine comprehension of the late development processes. Thus, some theories of late development offer important insights when static conceptions of competition are set aside (Lewis).

In contrast, others are limited by their static theories of competition (Prebisch, Emmanuel, and Baran). Still, others offer essential insight into the late development processes because they use a dynamic approach to competition (Hymer, Kaldor, Gerschenkron, and Mandel). Moreover, dynamic conceptions of competition, particularly the Marxian theory, offer a valuable framework for constructing a theory of uneven and combined late capitalist development.

Please find a link to the book here.

Understanding Green Finance: A Critical Assessment and Alternative Perspectives

Edited by Johannes Jäger | Edward Elgar Publishing, 2024

Exploring how green finance has become a key strategy for the financial industry in the wake of the 2007-08 financial crisis, this timely book critically assesses the current dominant forms of neoliberal green finance. Understanding Green Finance delivers a pioneering analysis of the topic, covering the essential tenets of green finance with an emphasis on critical approaches to mainstream views and presenting alternatives insights and perspectives.

This prescient book first introduces the concept of, and current approaches to, green finance and green monetary policy, ultimately presenting a range of potential alternatives including both reformist and transformative-progressive approaches. Chapters explore how neoliberal green finance tends to deepen financialisation, and does not effectively address environmental problems, offering insights into reformist forms of green finance that insist that state regulation and public financing are crucial to tackling environmental problems.

A crucial contribution to the debate surrounding the financial industry’s role in addressing the environmental crisis, this book will be beneficial for academics and students with an interest in environmental, ecological and financial economics. The accessible writing style will also prove valuable for policy makers, civil society professionals and financial and sustainability experts.

Please find a link to the book here.

Whose Planet? Essays on Ecocentric Socialism

By Kamran Nayeri | BookBaby, 2024

This book outlines Ecocentric Socialism as a theory of humanity embedded in nature to understand and help solve social and ecological crises of the twenty-first century, especially the existential crises of catastrophic climate change, the Sixth Extinction, recurring pandemics, and nuclear holocaust. Aside from the obvious cases, scientists in related fields have come to a consensus that these are anthropogenic (human-caused) crises. Some of its key features are as follows:

An ecological theory of human nature. Thanks to recent discoveries about the microbiome, we now know that humans are collective organisms that have been co-evolving with microbial communities, trillions of bacteria, viruses, yeasts, protozoa, and fungi. The microbiome affects our gut, which affects our brain. Also, the brain affects our gut, which affects our microbiome. Disruptions to the gut microbiome, say by infection or a change in diet, can trigger reactions in the body that may affect psychological, behavioral, and neurological health. In brief, who we are and how we think and feel and behave, is partly the result of the dynamic interactions between human cells and bacteria, viruses, yeasts, protozoa, and fungi that live as part of us.

A much longer view of history which places society in its natural context. This new knowledge about our ecological nature must be placed in the context of the dynamics of the following trends: (1) The geophysical trend which recognizes that life emerged from non-life 3.7 million years ago and that we are an earthbound, oxygen-breathing, energy-using species dependent upon our physical environment―especially the atmosphere, soil, and temperature range remaining compatible with human life, (2) the evolutionary transhistorical trend which recognizes and celebrates our continuity with other animals, (3) the evolutionary trend cumulating in the genus Homo going back 2.5 million years and the emergence of Homo sapiens at least 300,000 ago, and (4) the recent historical development since the rise of farming 12,000 years ago and class societies (civilization) about 5,000 years ago.

Animistic materialism. The Scientific Revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries developed in tandem with commercialization of the world and later with the rise of the capitalist mode of production effectively suppressed animistic views of nature prevalent across the world in favor of a mechanical view of nature. This included even the science of ecology. As a Native American and a professional biologist, Robin Wall Kimmerer (2023, p. 331, emphasis added) has put it this way: "The ecosystem is not a machine, but a community of beings, subjects rather than objects. What if those beings were the drivers?" In socialist and ecosocialist theories also, despite allusions to "dialectics of nature," humanity is the sole subject in "history." Animistic materialism and its philosophic gaze, that I call ecocentrism, gives agency to all animate and inanimate beings as manifested in their interrelationship. Ecocentric Socialism is built on animistic materialism. Whereas socialist and ecosocialist theories by and large are based on the Western scientific approach to nature, Ecocentric Socialism shares animistic views of nature with hunter-gatherers and Indigenous Peoples of the world that are surprisingly much closer to what we know about the natural world and our place in it since Charles Darwin's theory of evolution and the current knowledge of what makes us human. The difference is fundamental, in that, the anthropocentric socialist and ecosocialist theories and policy proposals generally share the idea of a "sustainable society" where the socialist humanity will manage ecosystems wisely. In animistic views of nature, humanity can never become managers of nature, and attempts to do so on a large scale will create ecological crises as we know from 5,000 years of civilization."

Please find a link to the book here.

Heterodox Graduate Programs, Scholarships and Grants

Call for applications: EPOG-Doctoral network Scholarships

The MSCA-funded EPOG-DN (Economic Policies for the Global bifurcation - Doctoral Network) project aims to establish a community of economists capable of collaborating with various disciplines, sectors and stakeholders to address ecological challenges. It gathers 8 full partners (beneficiaries) and 12 associated partners from different fields and sectors. EPOG-DN is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Doctoral Network (2024–2028) that offers 11 PhD positions scheduled to commence in September/October 2024. PhD positions are 36-month positions.

This project explores the pathways toward achieving strong sustainability, where social, economic and environmental objectives are not substitutable with each other. The project introduces the concept ofglobal bifurcation, which encompasses a range of multidimensional and systemic processes. The project proposes a distinctive strategy for tackling the complexity of global bifurcation, which involves a socio-technical, socio-economic and socio-ecological perspective, all working in concert to develop a systemic approach.

The EPOG-DN project offers 11 fully funded scholarships for doctoral candidates (DCs), as listed below:

Scholarships

More details here. Applications submitted prior to March 1, 2024, will receive primary consideration and undergo review throughout the month of March. Nonetheless, we may consider applications received after this date until all positions are filled. More information: www.epog-dn.eu

Application deadline: 1 March 2024 - 13:00 (Paris time).

Call for researchers to conduct a study on Excess Profit Taxes

The Left Group in the European Parliament is looking for researchers to commission a study on Excess Profit Taxes (EPT). The aim of the study would be to calculate the excess profits made by multinationals with a presence in the EU since the pandemic and during the energy and food price crisis. The study would serve as an update of the 2021 study on EPT: https://left.eu/content/uploads/2021/11/FISC-v1.pdf The study should be between 20-30 pages and would need to be carried out in a short timeframe. The deadline to submit the study would be beginnings of April 2024. If you are interested or would like further information, please contact christian.scholzalvarado@europarl.europa.euas soon as possible. Please attach a CV to your email.

Call for researchers to conduct a study on a European food price cap

The Left Group in the European Parliament is looking for researchers to commission a study on a cap on margins of agri-food companies with a view on controlling food prices. The aim of the study would be to conceptualize a mechanism to cap margins and to estimate the concrete impact of this mechanism on food prices in the EU or specific EU countries. Given the high level of ambition of this study and the short time available, we are open to alternative suggestions from researchers. The study should be between 20-30 pages and would need to be carried out in a short timeframe. The deadline to submit the study would be beginnings of April 2024. If you are interested or would like further information, please contact christian.scholzalvarado@europarl.europa.euas soon as possible. Please attach a CV to your email.

For Your Information

New Journal: Review of the History of Economic Thought and Methodology

We are delighted to announce the founding of Review of the History of Economic Thought and Methodology, a new open-access online journal that will begin publishing later this year under the auspices of the Open Library of Humanities (OLH).

As you know, for the last decade, we have co-edited Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology, a book series originally founded by Warren Samuels in 1983 and most recently published by Emerald Insight. We have long struggled to sustain the series, given the peculiarities of impact-factor considerations, which rate book series differently than (i.e., below) journals, and the concomitant difficulties involved in competing as a book series with the journals in the field. After several frustrating and ultimately fruitless negotiations with Emerald intended to transform the book series into a journal, we sought alternative publishing options.

Here’s a bit about OLH’s unique and compelling publication model:

[OLH] is an award-winning, academic-led, diamond open-access publisher of 28 journals based at Birkbeck, University of London. As part of an international community of scholar-led, community-owned and non-profit publishers, the OLH plays a leading role in a growing publishing ecosystem that explores innovative business models and novel approaches of open access publishing. […]

[T]he platform currently covers its costs by payments from an international library consortium, rather than author-facing fees (also known as Article Processing Charges). This funding mechanism enables equitable open access in the humanities disciplines, releasing readers and authors from the prohibitive costs of publishing open access. […]

Our journals benefit from the latest advances in online journal publishing – with high-quality presentation, annotative functionality, robust digital preservation, strong discoverability and easy-to-share social media buttons.

Our mission is to support and extend open access to scholarship in the humanities – for free, for everyone, for ever.

For more information about OLH, please visit https://www.openlibhums.org

We should have an online submission system established later this spring and we aim to publish the first volume of Review of (née Research in) the History of Economic Thought and Methodology before the end of 2024.

The new journal will feature the same format as the old book series. Each volume will include a guest-edited, monothematic, symposium, as well as general research articles and new archival discoveries. We also hope to re-establish the traditions you’ve come to associate with RHETM, like our annual Warren Samuels Prize for Interdisciplinary Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology, and the more recent Student’s Work-In-Progress Competition. We hope to extend the legacy commenced by Warren Samuels over 40 years ago.

Suffice it to say, we hope that you will submit your own work and encourage submissions from friends, colleagues, and students to the new RHETM. We will need all the help we can get over the next few years, as we seek to develop an audience and grow our impact factor.

We are available to answer any questions you might have. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with the Editors:

Public statement of resignation from Editorial Board of the Journal of Economic Surveys

In January 2024 we stood down from our roles as members of the Advisory Board, Editors-in-Chief, Managing Editors, Journal Administrator and Associate Editors for the Journal of Economic Surveys.

Out of respect for Authors and Referees and recognising the importance of academic publishing in our profession we have retained editorial duties of the papers assigned to us while we served on the Editorial Board of the Journal.

We no longer believed that the corporate policies and practices of the Journal’s publisher, Wiley, as we perceived them through several statements made by Wiley and the draft of a new editor agreement submitted to the attention of Editors-in-Chief and Managing Editors by Wiley, were coherent with ours.

We made the decision reluctantly after very careful thought, consideration, receiving legal advice and being unsuccessful in having our lawyer partake in negotiations on the submitted draft to identify a mutually acceptable balance.

The non-negotiable documentation submitted to our analysis appeared to emphasize quantity over quality of the papers submitted and strongly favoured cross pollination among the various Wiley publications also in relation to papers that we would have not considered favourably for the Journal of Economic Surveys increasing – in our perception – risks of proliferation of poor-quality science.

More generally, we felt a lack of appreciation for Editorial Board members’ bona fide contributions. Bona fide contributions include our scholarly knowledge, professional relationships, time, as well as Editorial Board members’ names. We make these contributions to academic publishing to discover and disseminate quality scientific research and generate knowledge to enhance decision- and policymaking.

As highlighted in several (publicly available) media by Wiley:

It was our perception that – under the newly proposed draft agreement – continuing to serve as members of the Editorial Board would have exposed us to potential reputational risks and, in the case of Editors-in-Chief and Managing Editors, also to potential significant (and unreasonable) financial risks. In our view, the documentation proposed inappropriately managed risks, in particular, risks arising from research integrity threats.

As we believe should appear reasonable, considering the goals we pursue by contributing to academic publishing, it is fundamental for us that the publishers we collaborate with are:

Unfortunately, at this stage, we feared that the new terms of engagement brought to the attention of Editors-in-Chief and Managing Editors by Wiley were not adequate in ensuring these fundamental prerequisites for a serene collaboration as, in our perception, confirmed by Wiley’s widely available statements (as summarized above).

We make this public statement to:

  1. raise editors’ awareness about the changing risks of editorial duties;

  2. urge debate about the direction of academic publishing which we believe has an increasing risk of undermining the integrity of discovery, generation and dissemination of quality scientific research and knowledge; and

  3. highlight that editor agreements that expose editors to unlimited liability for work that is ultimately pro-bono, are – in our opinion – unacceptable.

We would like to thank everyone who has contributed to the Journal of Economic Surveys, and in particular, all our Referees for the time and scholarly knowledge they gave to the Journal, and we thank Authors for submitting their research. The Journal of Economic Surveys could not have achieved the international peer reputation it has established without the goodwill and human capital of the economics profession!

Managing Editors-in-Chief

Managing Editors

Journal Administrator

Associate Editors

Advisory board